Thomas Dimopoulos

Thomas Dimopoulos

City Beat and Arts & Entertainment Editor
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Friday, 07 October 2016 14:39

Notes From City Hall

SARATOGA SPRINGS — The city’s proposed operating budget in 2017 will top $45.5 million – an approximate three percent increase over 2016 – but will contain no increase in taxes for city taxpayers, according to the proposal released by city Finance Commissioner Michele Madigan this week.

The $45.52 million plan marks an increase of $1.51 million over the 2016 budget, with contractual wages and health insurance accounting for nearly all of the change. Main revenue sources supporting the operating budget remain largely the same as 2016 - little to no increase is anticipated for sales tax, mortgage tax, state aid, or video-lottery terminal aid (VLT). VLT is budgeted about $498,000 higher than in years past to reflect the amount received for each of the past three years ($2.325 million).

“In the face of large and obligatory expense increases and otherwise flat revenues, this is not the year to leave money on the table,” Madigan said, in a statement.

The 2017 Budget counts both reserve funds and fund balance among its revenue resources. Amounts supporting the general operating budget include funds from unassigned fund balance ($541,000), the Retirement Reserve ($300,000) and the Tax Stabilization Reserve ($775,000).

“With no new revenue sources, little revenue growth, an almost 8 percent increase in health care costs, I can think of few better circumstances to use this reserve. It was created for this purpose. It is funded with taxpayer dollars. Taxpayers deserve to use their reserve rather than pay more taxes or receive diminished services,” Madigan said. The Council last month voted unanimously in favor of using up to about half of the reserve. This is the fifth city budget put forth by Madigan that contains virtually no increase in property tax and the 2017 budget year marks the sixth time municipalities are required to remain under the state property tax cap. Public budget workshops will take place: 1 p.m. on Wednesday Oct. 12; Wednesday, Oct. 19, and Monday, Oct. 24. A Public Comment period will also be provided during each workshop. The first of two public hearings will take place at 6:45 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 18. The council must adopt a budget by Nov. 30; if it doesn’t, the proposed comprehensive budget will become the 2017 adopted budget. The 2017 budget proposal can be viewed on the city’s website at www.saratoga-springs.org.

 

City Requests Resident Feedback For Open Space Plan

The city of Saratoga Springs is conducting a survey to update its Open Space Plan and asks residents to participate in a survey regarding their needs and concerns as it relates to open space and future open space planning. “Open Space” in the survey is defined as: public and privately-owned undeveloped lands which are important for a variety of reasons, including recreation, conservation, water resource protection, agriculture, forestry, or simply because of their scenic qualities and their contribution to the overall character of the town. To take the survey, go to: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/X62W7JX

 

Weibel Ave. Not What It Used To Be

“Weibel Avenue has changed dramatically. It’s no longer the rural road it used to be,” said Public Safety Commissioner Chris Mathiesen, referencing a plan to lower the speed limit from 40 to 30 mph on Weibel, from Lake Avenue to the city line on Louden Road. A public hearing regarding the proposal will take place Oct. 18 with a potential City Council vote to follow later in the evening.

SARATOGA SPRINGS — Frances Steloff was two months old when one of the worst blizzards in American history battered the northeast, killing more than 400 people and dropping nearly six feet of snow on Saratoga Springs.

Steloff was born on New Year’s Eve in 1887 and on her 100th birthday was presented the keys to the city by Saratoga Springs Mayor Ellsworth Jones. In the time between, she helped launch a literary foundation whose repercussions are being felt around the world, still. Young Frances grew up on the west side of Saratoga, the clamor of the Delaware & Hudson Railroad rumbling outside her bedroom window. On summer days in turn-of-the-century Saratoga Springs, she sold flowers to tourists at the Grand Union Hotel. At 19, Steloff ran off to New York City and in 1920 opened her bookstore - the Gotham Book Mart - on the city’s west side. Over the next 60 years she earned a reputation as a courageous force in the business of words.

Steloff battled with censors and sold in her store then-banned books penned by James Joyce, D. H. Lawrence, and Henry Miller – often receiving copies to sell from the authors themselves. Her actions helped lead to landmark decisions and making available works that were previously expelled. From Charlie Chaplin and George and Ira Gershwin, to Woody Allen, Dylan Thomas and Patti Smith, artists of all types became regular customers at the Gotham, where the store’s familiar sign - ''Wise Men Fish Here” – hung outside the shop’s storefront window. Steloff sent money to Anais Nin to publish her books, hired Allen Ginsberg and Tennessee Williams as store clerks and staged book-signing parties for authors like William S. Burroughs.

“The number of well-known writers, dancers, artists and theater people who were her customers, clients and friends made up an encyclopedia of 20th-century culture,” the New York Times reported about the literary haven, shortly after Steloff’s death in 1989. Despite spending several decades away, the native Saratogian re-visited her old haunts.

“I am sorry the old house is no longer there,” she told city resident Paula Costamzo, in a letter written on Gotham stationary in 1987 and salvaged for safe-keeping in the Saratoga Room of the Saratoga Springs Public Library. “I sometimes visit the old grounds near the place where the train engines used to stop for fuel, water, etc., to see if I might retrieve some of the pennies and other childhood treasures which slipped through the cracks in the boards of what used to be the old house porch.”

Steloff died in 1989 at the age of 101, and was buried in Saratoga Springs. The west 47th street building that housed the bookstore and Steloff’s upstairs apartment - which she initially purchased for $65,000 -was sold for $7.2 million dollars in 2003.

The Saratoga native is remembered in name by Skidmore College’s hosting of the school’s annual Frances Steloff Lecture. This year’s event, which takes place Tuesday, Oct. 4, features guest lecturer Art Spiegelman – a decade-long artist for the New Yorker, and a 1992 Pulitzer Prize winner for Maus, his ground-breaking graphic novel of the Holocaust.

Spiegelman grew up in Queens, N.Y. and began his career by cartooning for Topps bubblegum cards. Popular images depicting “Star Wars” movie characters, and a Cabbage Patch Kids parody called “Garbage Pail Kids” are among his creations. Spiegelman became a key figure in 1970s comics subculture, founding the influential avant-garde comics magazine Raw and during the 1980s drew on his father’s concentration-camp experiences to create his acclaimed “Maus.” “Maus II,” and “Metamaus” would follow. After 9/11, he created a cycle of broadsheet pages, "In the Shadow of No Towers," which was serialized in the London Review of Books and published in book form in the U.S. Retrospective exhibitions of his work have been held recently at major museums from Paris and Cologne to Los Angeles. His multimedia “Wordless,” on the history of the graphic novel, premiered at the Sydney Opera House in 2013 and the Brooklyn Academy of Music in 2014. In 2015 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

In 1994, Spiegelman applied his black-and-white drawings to Joseph Moncure March’s “The Wild Party,” a jazz-age tragedy first published 1928. In a peculiar case of serendipity given the circumstances of the Steloff lecture, it was William Burroughs, who after first reading “The Wild Party” in the 1930s, explained: it's the book that made me want to be a writer. Spiegelman will deliver the Frances Steloff Lecture, titled "What the %@&*! Happened to Comics?" at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 4 on the campus of Skidmore College. The event, staged in Gannett Auditorium of Palamountain Hall, is free and open to the public and will begin with the artist receiving an honorary doctorate of humane letters and will end with a Q&A and a book-signing of his most recent works.

Friday, 30 September 2016 15:08

Hope for the Best: Prepare for the Worst

SARATOGA SPRINGS — Workplace violence and school shootings. Catastrophic weather events and rail accidents exposing residential neighborhoods to hazardous materials.

“Those to me are the hazards we face on any given day,” explained John Catone. The assistant city police chief recently completed a near-two-year project of compiling potential disaster concerns in Saratoga Springs and how to best address them. The Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan – comprised of approximately 500 pages of documents and annexes – was unanimously approved by the council this month. It is the first new comprehensive plan the city has had in nearly a decade.

Risk preparedness, response, and recovery are three aspects of the plan. In terms of concerns, the potential of a catastrophic weather event, and terrorism register on the city agenda. “You’re also taking into account school shootings and workplace violence, because that’s really what’s going on today,” Catone said. The potential for public exposure to hazardous materials weighs heavily, as well.

“What is of interest around here is the rail. In terms of a potential incident, that is a reality for us because we have a lot of things shipped along the rail line that runs along a large section of the city,” Catone said. The Department of Environmental Conservation and the state Thruway Authority are preparing a draft Environmental Impact Statement regarding a pipeline project which would span nearly 170 miles from Albany to New Jersey and carry Bakken crude oil through Saratoga Springs and in close proximity to local homes, Saratoga Hospital, Skidmore College and Saratoga Springs High School.

“Originally there was some discussion about whether we could use what we had (written prior to 2008) and make some adjustments. I started reading through it and saw there was no way. Times have changed. So many adjustments have been made to emergency management that the only way was to do a total re-write of the plan; take the old one and do an entirely new one based on all the things that have occurred since Hurricane Katrina,” Catone said.

The combination of a short-staffed department – decimated from 68 to 69 members down to 54 because of layoffs and retirements – and an ever-changing City Council which didn’t place a high priority on emergency management, contributed to the time-lag, Catone said. The City Charter stipulates the plan should be reviewed every three years. Catone is pushing to change that to an annual review, as well as getting all of the city departments involved.

“I made it clear to the council that they’ve got to change the City Charter, because things change so much in emergency management. This should be a fluid document. If you wait three years and it becomes a fourth and a fifth year, then whoever comes after me is going to have to do a complete re-write,” Catone said.

“The way it’s written, it also all falls under the Commissioner of Public Safety, but that’s not the way it’s supposed to be. The Commissioner of Public Safety does not make financial policy – that’s Finance; does not make purchasing policy – that’s Accounts; does not deal with other things that belongs to the mayor’s office, or manage the resources and personnel of DPW. So, I came back to everybody and said: this is the draft and you all have to be involved.”

On any given day, the city population of 29,000 can swell exponentially given visitors to large venues such as the racecourse, SPAC, and special events staged throughout the year, as well as the flow of area residents from rapidly expanding adjoining communities.

“We are very unique. Without all the planning and training we do, there’s no way that we could accommodate all those events (and guard against) major incidents. If the first day you’re going to prepare for this is the day that the event happens - forget it. The event will have already run you over,” said Catone who is chairman of the Emergency Management Team and is currently coordinating a Disaster and Recovery Team to include members of all departments.

Police training has amped up in recent years to include active shooter drills, large-scale school evacuations, and in preparation of potential scenarios at places like Saratoga Hospital and Skidmore College.

“I can tell you from experience: never say never,” said city DPW Commissioner Anthony “Skip” Scirocco. “When I was county supervisor, I can’t tell you the chaos that happened after the tornado in Mechanicville because of the radio system; nobody could talk to anyone down there and I don’t think there was a comprehensive plan in place like this one. Through situations like that, we learn and we make changes.”

Recent changes include integration with the county radio system to allow for better communication in the case of a major emergency, developing a business continuity plan to specify how each department expects to function in the case of a major disaster, and designating a shelter or other place where people can bring their pets – the latter being a lesson learned after people lost their lives during Hurricane Katrina because they refused to evacuate their homes and leave their pets behind.

“You also need to have an emergency operation center,” Catone said. “It can’t be on the hood of a car. When we had the major ice storm in 2006, the council met in the stairwell down by the vending machine because there was nothing else. You can’t operate that way.”

In February 2006, a winter storm plunged the city into an icy darkness that lasted in some wards for several days. Since that time, an emergency generator has been installed at City Hall, and Catone has specified the Saratoga Music Hall, on the upper floor of City Hall, would serve as an operations center.

“The major players all work in this building. We’ll be able to do things with the generator running and if we gather in the Music Hall it will give us, for now, a place to break out into work groups and bring everybody together for meetings,” he said. At least one alternate site still needs to be designated, as the city has plans to convert the hall into a courtroom.

“The public has an expectation given all the events of the past 10 or 15 years that you know how to do this, and that you’re prepared,” Catone said. “So, you better know how to do this.”

SARATOGA SPRINGS — Mike Finocchi cast his eyes across the big room which stands on the corner where Henry and Caroline streets meet. The executive director at Shelters of Saratoga took stock of the kitchen, where wood cabinets bookend a stove and microwave, a refrigerator and a freezer. He noted the spacious women’s and men’s restrooms, strolled through the large adjacent room where supplies and clothing will be stored, and imagined the dozens of cots that will be placed in the main room and made available to the city’s homeless population as a place to shelter during the harshest days of the impending winter. After setting up shop at the Salvation Army building during the past two years, Code Blue Saratoga – which is under the guidance of S.O.S. – was in need of a new temporary center to house its emergency shelter. A lease agreement with Soul Saving Station, in effect from Nov. 1, 2016 to April 1, 2017, was announced this week. S.O.S. will pay the organization monthly rent. Finocchi declined to specify the amount, but called the cost “fair.” “Thank God they stepped up,” said Finocchi. “It got to the point in the summer when you’re thinking: gosh, what are we going to do? We were running out of options.” The need for a city emergency shelter during the winter months is great. In its first abbreviated winter season in 2013-2014, the emergency shelter was open 58 nights and housed 928 overnight stays. In each of the past two years, the shelter was open more than 80 nights providing more than 3,054 and 3,344 overnight stays, respectively, in addition to more than 1,700 others who were provided dinner during the winter seasons of 2014-15 and 2015-16. Between 2007 and 2015, although homelessness nationwide decreased by 11 percent, it increased in New York, rising by 41 percent, according to the 2015 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Between 2014 and 2015 alone, New York State’s homeless population jumped by 7,660 - the largest increase in the nation for the one-year period. “You never know what leads one to being homeless,” Finocchi said. “It could be a bitter divorce, or someone who may have lost everything. You just never know.” The Code Blue Saratoga program was born from the tragic death of Nancy Pitts. The 54-year-old mother of two sought shelter on a Williams Street porch during a frigid December night in 2013. She was discovered by police the next morning. Within days of the homeless woman’s death, a cooperative partnership between then mayor-elect Joanne Yepsen, non-profit organizations, and members of the community was initiated and a plan set in motion to site an emergency shelter in the city. The shelter initially opened when temperatures dipped below 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Earlier this year, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed an executive order which directed emergency shelters to operate when temperatures dropped below 32 degrees. The new threshold – likely to mark an increase in the number of days the shelter would operate - complicated the process for the largely volunteer staff in Saratoga. Code Blue’s previous hosts - the Salvation Army Worship and Community Center on Woodlawn Avenue – could no longer house the shelter on site because the increased days would interfere with their own programming. “It’s easier for places in Albany, Schenectady and Troy who have mission type places to run that kind of program, but we don’t have that here,” said Finocchi, who added he was thankful Soul Saving Station stepped forward to make their Fellowship Hall available. “As soon as they reached out to us, we said, ‘we have available space,’” said Arnold Byrd II, church pastor at Soul Saving Station. “It made sense to us. It’s something we should be doing. You have to be supportive of those who need help.” Whereas the Salvation Army housed up to 100 cots, the new venue is slightly smaller. “It’s going to be a little tighter here, but the bottom line is no one needs to be sleeping on the street,” Finocchi said. “If it’s a little more snug than the Salvation Army, so be it, but at least people have an option other than the parking garage, or the woods and a tent.” Given the geographic proximity to the plethora of bars and taverns along Caroline Street, Finocchi said the organization will be diligent in monitoring the shelter and will institute a midnight curfew, after which people may come in, but not go out. Code Blue Saratoga will host a meeting and offer training for volunteers in October. Those interested in volunteering their time can sign up at: https://www.codebluesaratoga.org/wordpress/volunteer/how-to-volunteer/ For those interested in donating items, Code Blue Saratoga Director Cheryl Ann Murphy-Parant said the emergency shelter’s largest needs are men’s socks and underwear, canned food, and individually-wrapped snacks.

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Mike Finocchi cast his eyes across the big room which stands on the corner where Henry and Caroline streets meet.

The executive director at Shelters of Saratoga took stock of the kitchen, where wood cabinets bookend a stove and microwave, a refrigerator and a freezer. He noted the spacious women’s and men’s restrooms, strolled through the large adjacent room where supplies and clothing will be stored, and imagined the dozens of cots that will be placed in the main room and made available to the city’s homeless population as a place to shelter during the harshest days of the impending winter.

After setting up shop at the Salvation Army building during the past two years, Code Blue Saratoga – which is under the guidance of S.O.S. – was in need of a new temporary center to house its emergency shelter.  A lease agreement with Soul Saving Station, in effect from Nov. 1, 2016 to April 1, 2017, was announced this week. S.O.S. will pay the organization monthly rent. Finocchi declined to specify the amount, but called the cost “fair.” 

“Thank God they stepped up,” said Finocchi. “It got to the point in the summer when you’re thinking: gosh, what are we going to do? We were running out of options.”

The need for a city emergency shelter during the winter months is great. In its first abbreviated winter season in 2013-2014, the emergency shelter was open 58 nights and housed 928 overnight stays. In each of the past two years, the shelter was open more than 80 nights providing more than 3,054 and 3,344 overnight stays, respectively, in addition to more than 1,700 others who were provided dinner during the winter seasons of 2014-15 and 2015-16.    

Between 2007 and 2015, although homelessness nationwide decreased by 11 percent, it increased in New York, rising by 41 percent, according to the 2015 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Between 2014 and 2015 alone, New York State’s homeless population jumped by 7,660 - the largest increase in the nation for the one-year period.

“You never know what leads one to being homeless,” Finocchi said. “It could be a bitter divorce, or someone who may have lost everything. You just never know.” 

The Code Blue Saratoga program was born from the tragic death of Nancy Pitts. The 54-year-old mother of two sought shelter on a Williams Street porch during a frigid December night in 2013.  She was discovered by police the next morning. Within days of the homeless woman’s death, a cooperative partnership between then mayor-elect Joanne Yepsen, non-profit organizations, and members of the community was initiated and a plan set in motion to site an emergency shelter in the city.

"After Nancy Pitts, I was determined no one would die on the streets of Saratoga Springs ever again," Yepsen said Thursday. No city funds have been used in connection with the shelter.

The shelter initially opened when temperature dipped below 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Earlier this year, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed an executive order which directed emergency shelters to operate when temperatures dropped below 32 degrees. The new threshold – likely to mark an increase in the number of days the shelter would operate - complicated the process for the largely volunteer staff in Saratoga.  Code Blue’s previous hosts - the Salvation Army Worship and Community Center on Woodlawn Avenue – could no longer house the shelter on site because the increased days would interfere with their own programming.

“It’s easier for places in Albany, Schenectady and Troy who have mission type places to run that kind of program, but we don’t have that here,” said Finocchi, who added he was thankful Soul Saving Station stepped forward to make their Fellowship Hall available.

“As soon as they reached out to us, we said, ‘we have available space,’” said Arnold Byrd II, church pastor at Soul Saving Station. “It made sense to us. It’s something we should be doing. You have to be supportive of those who need help.”

Whereas the Salvation Army housed up to 100 cots, the new venue is slightly smaller. “It’s going to be a little tighter here, but the bottom line is no one needs to be sleeping on the street,” Finocchi said. “If it’s a little more snug than the Salvation Army, so be it, but at least people have an option other than the parking garage, or the woods and a tent.”   

Given the geographic proximity to the plethora of bars and taverns along Caroline Street, Finocchi said the organization will be diligent in monitoring the shelter and will institute a midnight curfew, after which people may come in, but not go out.

Code Blue Saratoga will host a meeting and offer training for volunteers in October. Those interested in volunteering their time can sign up at: https://www.codebluesaratoga.org/wordpress/volunteer/how-to-volunteer/

 

For those interested in donating items, Code Blue Saratoga Director Cheryl Ann Murphy-Parant said the emergency shelter’s largest needs are men’s socks and underwear, canned food, and individually-wrapped snacks. 

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Mike Finocchi cast his eyes across the big room which stands on the corner where Henry and Caroline streets meet.

The executive director at Shelters of Saratoga took stock of the kitchen, where wood cabinets bookend a stove and microwave, a refrigerator and a freezer. He noted the spacious women’s and men’s restrooms, strolled through the large adjacent room where supplies and clothing will be stored, and imagined the dozens of cots that will be placed in the main room and made available to the city’s homeless population as a place to shelter during the harshest days of the impending winter.

After setting up shop at the Salvation Army building during the past two years, Code Blue Saratoga – which is under the guidance of S.O.S. – was in need of a new temporary center to house its emergency shelter.  A lease agreement with Soul Saving Station, in effect from Nov. 1, 2016 to April 1, 2017, was announced this week. S.O.S. will pay the organization monthly rent. Finocchi declined to specify the amount, but called the cost “fair.” 

“Thank God they stepped up,” said Finocchi. “It got to the point in the summer when you’re thinking: gosh, what are we going to do? We were running out of options.”

The need for a city emergency shelter during the winter months is great. In its first abbreviated winter season in 2013-2014, the emergency shelter was open 58 nights and housed 928 overnight stays. In each of the past two years, the shelter was open more than 80 nights providing more than 3,054 and 3,344 overnight stays, respectively, in addition to more than 1,700 others who were provided dinner during the winter seasons of 2014-15 and 2015-16.    

Between 2007 and 2015, although homelessness nationwide decreased by 11 percent, it increased in New York, rising by 41 percent, according to the 2015 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Between 2014 and 2015 alone, New York State’s homeless population jumped by 7,660 - the largest increase in the nation for the one-year period.

“You never know what leads one to being homeless,” Finocchi said. “It could be a bitter divorce, or someone who may have lost everything. You just never know.” 

The Code Blue Saratoga program was born from the tragic death of Nancy Pitts. The 54-year-old mother of two sought shelter on a Williams Street porch during a frigid December night in 2013.  She was discovered by police the next morning. Within days of the homeless woman’s death, a cooperative partnership between then mayor-elect Joanne Yepsen, non-profit organizations, and members of the community was initiated and a plan set in motion to site an emergency shelter in the city.

The shelter initially opened when temperature dipped below 20 degrees Fahrenheit. Earlier this year, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed an executive order which directed emergency shelters to operate when temperatures dropped below 32 degrees. The new threshold – likely to mark an increase in the number of days the shelter would operate - complicated the process for the largely volunteer staff in Saratoga.  Code Blue’s previous hosts - the Salvation Army Worship and Community Center on Woodlawn Avenue – could no longer house the shelter on site because the increased days would interfere with their own programming.

“It’s easier for places in Albany, Schenectady and Troy who have mission type places to run that kind of program, but we don’t have that here,” said Finocchi, who added he was thankful Soul Saving Station stepped forward to make their Fellowship Hall available.

“As soon as they reached out to us, we said, ‘we have available space,’” said Arnold Byrd II, church pastor at Soul Saving Station. “It made sense to us. It’s something we should be doing. You have to be supportive of those who need help.”

Whereas the Salvation Army housed up to 100 cots, the new venue is slightly smaller. “It’s going to be a little tighter here, but the bottom line is no one needs to be sleeping on the street,” Finocchi said. “If it’s a little more snug than the Salvation Army, so be it, but at least people have an option other than the parking garage, or the woods and a tent.”   

Given the geographic proximity to the plethora of bars and taverns along Caroline Street, Finocchi said the organization will be diligent in monitoring the shelter and will institute a midnight curfew, after which people may come in, but not go out.

Code Blue Saratoga will host a meeting and offer training for volunteers in October. Those interested in volunteering their time can sign up at: https://www.codebluesaratoga.org/wordpress/volunteer/how-to-volunteer/

 

For those interested in donating items, Code Blue Saratoga Director Cheryl Ann Murphy-Parant said the emergency shelter’s largest needs are men’s socks and underwear, canned food, and individually-wrapped snacks. 

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Adam Frelin studied the glow of a firefly. He watched it take in oxygen and the pattern of internment flashes it produced. Then he started thinking about what he saw and how to adapt it to the human world.    

“It’s one of those things we’re compelled to look at. You look at a lightning bug and think: where else can that be applied?” explained Frelin, an artist, associate professor of art at the University at Albany, and a decade-long resident of Troy.

Two years ago, Frelin and local architect Barbara Nelson, began collaborating on a plan to create an unprecedented, multi-city public art installation. They called it “Breathing Lights.”  The proposal won the Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge, and was awarded a $1 million prize.

“We looked at the region we live in, and tried to recognize both the assets and the detriments we could work with,” Frelin said. “The assets had to do with the history of lighting technology – what took place at GE over the years and what’s now taking place at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The detriment would have to be vacancies.

“We have 2,500 vacant buildings in the Capital Region and most of those buildings exist in neighborhoods that have been historically disinvested in one way or another,” he said. “The idea is to create a light effect that would be in these buildings. In this case, that effect creates the appearance of the light breathing.”

In October and November, Breathing Lights will result in the illumination of windows in hundreds of vacant homes in Albany, Schenectady and Troy.

Friday night, Saratoga Springs was granted a sneak peek of the installation that will be attracting national attention to the Capital Region. The area’s first glimpse was staged at Spring Street Gallery, where the building’s window glowed in a gentle rhythm to simulate human breath. Outside the gallery, where ArtsFestFridays staged a celebration in conjunction with the event, the tree branches bowing over Spring Street sprouted leaves bathed in lavender hues. Glow-in-the-dark street performers danced on the pavement accompanied by a throbbing beat produced by a DJ with an affection for the disco era.

Concentrated in neighborhoods with high levels of vacancy, Breathing Lights will transform abandoned structures from pockets of shadows into places of warmth.

“We’re lighting hundreds of them throughout the Capital Region,” Frelin said. His art – which depicts the intersection of the natural and the constructed world - are on exhibit inside the gallery: a gigantic four-way mirror is dropped into a busy vehicular intersection in Las Vegas resulting in auto-vertigo;  massive harmonicas are planted atop natural green mountains that seem to inspire a cacophony of sharps and flats blown by the random wind. There are images of hot embers spraying a scarred ridge, and city fountains cast in bronze modeled after the individual faces of its citizenry.

A public art dialogue featuring Frelin will be staged 6:30 p.m. Friday at Spring Street Gallery, on 110 Spring St. The exhibition will be on display weekdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Oct. 29.  

“Breathing Lights takes place in neighborhoods that don’t usually have these type of projects happening, or this kind of attention,” Fredlin said. The ‘breathing lights” in a vacant building can reference different things - a life that once lived there, a life that might return should the building was to be re-occupied, the artist noted. “We hope, beyond creating something beautiful, to be able to draw some attention to an issue that a lot of work needs to be done.”

 

At the end of the installation, the windows – one by one – will fall dark, their shared sense of loss stirring a call to action.

SARATOGA SPRINGS – THERE COMES A MOMENT when the band is on stage and when that moment comes everyone knows it.

The Moment generally occurs late in the musical set - strategically placed to accelerate momentum toward a grand finale - and when it happens, it transcends space and time. The moment is introduced with a series of notes plucked on guitar, or the beat of a drum, or a voice that taps a foggy, yet familiar memory. It happens with a song you heard more than million times during this summer or that, but have not heard in a long time since. And when you hear it once again all the feelings of the original moment come rushing back to remind of a time when the world was new and anything possible.

Those moments came often last week at Saratoga Performing Arts Center on a night that featured a trio of bands, each capable of producing shared memories.

 For Cheap Trick, it came during “Dream Police,” posted at the tail-end of a 60-minute set and featuring longtime Tricksters Zander, Nielsen and Petersson on a checkerboard stage. Nearly half the songs of the band’s set appeared on the “Live at Budokan” sessions a generation ago. The set included fan favorites “Surrender,” and “I Want You to Want Me,” as well as a weird mash-up of the Velvet Underground’s “I’m Waiting For The Man” and “Heroin,” with guitarist Rick Nielsen channeling his inner Robert Quine, shredding and slashing his six-string noisemaker in a discordant symphony.

For Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, the moment came during her rendition of the early-80’s hit “I Love Rock ‘n’ Roll.” Jett’s Blackhearts hit the ground running, providing a solid sonic foundation to support her performance of “Bad Reputation,” “Fake Friends,” and “Love is Pain.” There were sturdy covers of Tommy James’ “Crimson and Clover,” Sly Stone’s “Everyday People,” Gary Glitter’s “Do You Wanna Touch Me,” and Bruce Springsteen’s “Light of Day” – the latter accompanied by a video reel showcasing Jett’s duo with actor Michael J. Fox in the 1987 film of the same name, on a backdrop.  

Jett revisited her days with The Runaways in a staged reproduction of “You Drive Me Wild,” and “Cherry Bomb” – the latter being a timeless ode to troublemaking teen-hood that somehow did not seem out-of-place in the hands of the 57-year-old performer.

Heart, headliners of the night, reached back to the 1970s to perform “Magic Man,” “Barracuda,” “Kick it Out,” and “Straight On,” and came full circle on a 40-year timeline when they delivered “Beautiful Broken,” from their just-released album of the same name.  Truth-be-told, Heart sounds better today than they ever did.

Guitarist Nancy Wilson’s extended two-minute acoustic guitar introduction that morphed into “Crazy On You” brought the crowd to its collective feet, and sister Ann Wilson’s amazingly still-vibrant-after-all-these-years vocals kept the crowd standing, showcasing her talents most notably on the power ballad “What About Love?”  and the double-barreled dose of the band’s Led Zeppelin-inspired encore, featuring “The Immigrant Song,” and “Stairway To Heaven,” and including Wilson’s invocation of Robert Plant’s now-legendary ad-lib: “Does anyone remember laughter?”

You couldn’t have imagined a triple-bill featuring Heart, Joan Jett, and Cheap Trick taking place in the 1970s, but touring 2016 style makes for strange stage-fellows. On a late summer day marked by a passive-aggressive weather front that was both slogged by rain and filled with sunshine, no one in the crowd was complaining, with nearly four hours of music supplying endless options for each to find their own special moment.  

SARATOGA SPRINGS — The seeds of a new café, set to open on Weibel Avenue next month, were planted more than 20 years ago in Saratoga Springs and has given rise to a longtime tradition. Now, Bread Basket Bakery Operations Manager Matthew Tallman hopes a new business he is preparing that will launch next month continues the tradition of success. Tallman and business partner George Kotsakis - whose expertise is in restaurant management and consulting - will open the Bread Basket Cafe at The Springs in early October. The 1,800-square-foot eatery will seat 48 people inside, feature a mini-conference area where a party of six to eight may gather together for meals, and include an additional 1,200-square-foot patio outdoors. They owners say the location - far enough from the bustle of downtown and featuring plenty of parking - is ideal, and just the site for which they have waited. “George and I have been talking about this for years. We made the decision to run with it,” said Tallman, whose mother, Joan Tallman, founded the Bread Basket Bakery out of a home kitchen in the 1980s. She moved the bakery into a storefront on Ludlow Street a quarter century ago, then relocated to an English cottage on Spring Street where fresh breads, pies, and an assortment of pastries have been served since. “My mom started the bakery in 1990. Twelve years ago my brother and I moved home to join the business with her,” Tallman said. “My brother does the baking and I do the rest.” The Bread Basket name will be carried forward with the new café, although it is a separate entity. The café menu will list omelets and pancakes among the breakfast items, salads, wraps and sandwiches for the lunch and dinner crowd, as well as a full array of muffins, scones, breads, desserts and a variety of coffees. “You’ll be able to get good food here, and your bill won’t be more than $10 to $15,” Tallman said. “He has the baking background, I have the European style coffee business experience and we put it all together,” said Kotsakis, whose Mediterranean background played a role in inserting menu items such as falafel, and spanakopita. In the main entry room currently under construction, Kotsakis envisions a barrista stationed at the forefront, serving espresso and cappuccino, Turkish coffees, Greek coffees, frappe, protein shakes, and other drinks. “Coffee brings people together” explained Kotsakis, standing in the room framed by a chocolate ceiling, green tea walls, and orange-tinged fans. A vacant spot on a nearby wall is reserved for a classic image depicting Sophia Loren and Cary Grant drinking coffee in a cafe. The owners plan on hiring up to six employees and will be open seven days per week. They are still finalizing the hours, but anticipate being open daily from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Friday, 09 September 2016 13:54

Lose 200 Jobs or Gain 1k?

SARATOGA SPRINGS — Faced with the possibility of losing a downtown business and the 200 people it employs, the City Council proactively adopted a resolution that aims to preserve those existing jobs as well as add approximately 800 more, and may result in the development of a multi-level parking structure that could house up to 1,250 vehicles. Ayco, a financial services company, whose local offices are housed in approximately 90,000 square feet of space at the Congress Park Centre, is seeking to consolidate operations. The move could result in the company leaving Saratoga Springs and setting up shop elsewhere. Conversely, the location selected for consolidation will see an influx of new employees. “The stakes are this: we can lose 200 jobs, or gain 1,000,” said Carrie Woerner, who represents the 113th Assembly District. “This is a transformational opportunity for the city.” City Finance Commissioner Michele Madigan this week introduced a non-binding resolution offering the the City Council’s assistance to investigate the options of constructing and maintaining a shared parking structure at Congress Park Centre. The City Council unanimously approved the resolution. “It’s a significant economic development,” Madigan said. “Saratoga Springs, I believe, is one of the areas they are considering. We want to help put forward the best possible proposal to have them consolidate their offices in Saratoga Springs.” While the specific details regarding the city’s financial investment in such a public-private partnership will need to be explored further, the location has already been approved to site a parking garage that holds up to 1,250 vehicles, as well as new construction that could significantly increase available office space. The plan was approved more than a decade ago as part of a Planned Unit Development, and doesn’t expire until 2020. “This is probably the next quadrant of the city that could benefit from a good public parking model,” Madigan said. Ayco currently operates in 90,000 square feet of space in Congress Park Centre, said the building’s owner, David Brause, and the PUD comfortably allows an increase to 250,000 square feet to accommodate new Ayco employees, should the company seek to consolidate its offices in Saratoga Springs. While any relocation is expected to take several years to reach fruition, Brause said he anticipates the company may make its decision about where to relocate by the end of 2016. “Losing those 200 jobs would be a blow, because we would end up with a building that would basically be empty. Would we be able to get other employers to relocate here? Possibly, but that’s a lot of work and it’s hard to do,” said city Public Safety Commissioner Chris Mathiesen. “Can we accommodate more people downtown? It’s a lot of people, but I think we can. I do think it’s the kind of investment that makes sense, but it would have to be paid parking.” Saratoga County IDA Chairman Rod Sutton and Saratoga County Chamber President Todd Shimkus are in favor of the increased job base and positive economic potential an Ayco consolidation would have in Saratoga Springs, and Teddy Foster, president of the nearby Universal Preservation Hall, is in favor of much-needed parking solutions for the immediate area. “It’s a win-win-win,” said city Mayor Joanne Yepsen. “This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity because Ayco is going to make a decision about where to consolidate and they want one campus. We want to be sure we're doing everything to make this as attractive as possible. I think parking is a big piece of that. The property is there and the design has already been approved, essentially. We’re already one step ahead and the timing and process will be abbreviated here versus any other location.” As a non-binding resolution, Commissioners Anthony “Skip” Scirocco and John Franck also voted to approve the resolution in the hope of exploring the details more fully, but each expressed reservations about what the financial costs would be for the city and the risk involved in building a structure for a company with no guarantee they would maintain their local footprint. Ayco issued a statement on the matter, which reads: “Ayco continues to grow, we are constantly exploring ways to improve our client service, realize greater operational and cost efficiencies and allow our employees to better collaborate and connect. Any decision will be considered carefully in consultation with numerous stakeholders, including our employees and local government officials.” In other news, the City Council by a 3-2 vote approved the Capital Budget for 2017. The budget consists of 25 projects at a total cost of $9.017 million, of which $7.34 million will be bonded. The balance will be funded by other sources, such as grants and reserves. The top Public Safety department project for 2017 is a $1.56 million upgrade of outdated communications infrastructure, including the correction of existing communication “dead zones” in the downtown area and at City Hall. Other high-ticket items include the $2.27 million Saratoga Greenbelt Trial Downtown Connector - incorporating bicyclist, pedestrian and transit improvements within the primary corridor and connecting the downtown area with residential neighborhoods; a complete renovation of the Finance Office at a cost of about $750,000, and plaster repair and painting of the historic Canfield Casino at a cost of $600,000. The council is hopeful the Greenbelt Trial Downtown Connector project will be awarded a $1.5 million grant. The awarding process is anticipated to take place in November. The City Council voted unanimously to accept a Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan. The previous plan, which Assistant City Police Chief John Catone in January said was grossly outdated, has been largely re-written during the past year. The 220-page plan includes an additional 300 pages of accompanying documents and lists potential hazards and vulnerable areas, methods to mitigate risk and the process for dealing with a variety of situations, catastrophic and otherwise. Catone recommended future plans be reviewed annually instead of every three years, as is presently done, and that all city departments play a larger role in developing the document, which currently is solely tasked to the Public Safety Department to construct. A summary of the major issues to be addressed in the future drafting of the city’s new Unified Development Ordinance has been publicly released. The UDO, once drafted, will replace the existing city zoning code, subdivision regulations and related development standards. The zoning diagnostic report was delivered to the City Council on Tuesday. A public meeting to discuss the recommendations will be staged 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 27 at the Saratoga Music Hall. The report may be viewed at: https://saratogaspringsudo.files.wordpress.com/2016/09/16_0829-zoning_diagnostic_final-draft.pdf.

Blotter

  • COURTS Wifredo F. Diaz, 44, was sentenced on April 20 to a total of 50 years -to-life in prison, to run consecutively, after the conviction for two counts predatory sexual assault, and single count charges of first degree sexual abuse, and second degree assault. Diaz was also previously convicted for failing to register as a sex offender. The convictions stem from an incident that occurred in Saratoga Springs in August 2016 during which, a trial jury found, Diaz violently, physically and sexually assaulted his victim.   Jennifer M. Pugliese, 36, of Fort Edward, was sentenced on April 20 to 3-1/2…

Property Transactions

  • BALLSTON SPA 16 Cypress St., $309,267. Heritage Builders Group LLC sold property to Howard and Jane Layer. CHARLTON 1202 Peaceable St., $110,000. Kazimierzi and Sandra Austro sold property to Bryan Bartczak.  749 Charlton Rd., $288,000. Scott Bobrowich and Jenna Battenhausen sold property to Leland and Melanie Roden.  106 Jenkins Rd., $219,500. Raymond Toohey sold property to Andrew Bodine and Reagan Beadles.  118 Dawson Rd., $215,000. Timothy and Kathie Warner sold property to Michael Gnip. CLIFTON PARK 41 Balsam Way, $456,987.  Heritage Builders Group LLC sold property to Yadi and Padma Dudi . 72 Via Da Vinci, $170,000. Raita and Jennifer…
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