Displaying items by tag: saratoga

Friday, 14 June 2019 13:49

Historic Yaddo Mansion Reopens June 20

SARATOGA SPRINGS – The historic Mansion at Yaddo reopens to the public on June 20 after a multimillion-dollar restoration and stabilization.

The renowned artist retreat has hosted the residencies of thousands of writers, poets, musicians, painters and other artists since 1926. In 2014, Yaddo’s Board and leadership spearheaded an ambitious project to restore, preserve and update Yaddo’s facilities, and launched a $1 million Capital Campaign to raise the necessary funds.

​In the fall of 2017, the 55-room mansion, built in 1893, was closed for a complex, ​18-month ​restoration focusing on exterior structural stabilization, upgraded electrical systems, masonry repointing, the removal of all 338 windows for replacement or repair, the installation of a new copper-and-slate roof, and the painstaking restoration by local artisans of beautiful 19th century decorative metalwork and stonework.

​The Mansion restoration is the final piece of a multi-stage plan to ensure Yaddo’s survival into its second century of service to artists​ and its​ reopening will increase Yaddo’s capacity. In 2019, the 400-acre retreat will see a more than 30 percent increase in the number of artist visits - a clear indication that the institution continues to provide crucial support and creative sanctuary to artists of all career stages and disciplines.

The Yaddo Summer Benefit on Thursday, June 20 will be the public’s first glimpse of the results of the massive renovation effort.

This year’s benefit program features singer-songwriter Mike Doughty, founder of the ‘90s band Soul Coughing.  Proceeds from the benefit play a crucial role in ensuring Yaddo’s artist residency program continues to flourish. For more information, go to: yaddo.org.

Published in Entertainment
Thursday, 13 June 2019 00:00

June 14 – June 20, 2019

COURT

Briana Slurff, 34, of Delanson, pleaded June 6 to aggravated vehicular assault in the first-degree, in Ballston. Sentencing scheduled Sept. 3. 

POLICE 

James C. Carr, 30, of Gansevoort, was charged with criminal contempt in the first-degree and criminal mischief in the third-degree- both felonies, endangering the welfare of a child, and harassment in connection with an alleged incident in the town of Northumberland. According to the Saratoga County Sheriff’s Office, Carr is suspected of damaging a motor vehicle by throwing a chunk of loose sidewalk at it, and of pushing and attempting to punch another person who was the protected party in an order of protection. 

Diego Torres, 25, of Albany, was charged June 6 with felony assault in the second-degree, in connection with an alleged incident that took place on Maple Avenue on May 12. Charges were filed after city police had publicly released surveillance photos seeking more information about the identity of the person depicted in the image.     

Ronald Fitzgerald, 81, of Hudson Falls, was charged June 1 with criminal contempt in the second-degree, and aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the third-degree, after being involved in a property damage accident on Nelson Avenue. 

Nicole Rose, 41, of Wilton, was charged June 2 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the third-degree, and unlawful possession of marijuana. 

Sean Hinnegan, 30, of Saratoga Springs, was charged on a warrant on May 14 for criminal mischief in the second-degree, a felony, and criminal mischief misdemeanor. 

Guy Pierce, 54, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 31 with assault in the second-degree, and burglary in the first-degree – both felonies; and the following misdemeanors: menacing, criminal mischief, and criminal possession weapon.

Miles Willis, 20, of Greenfield Center, was charged June 4 with criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh-degree, and unlawful possession of marijuana. 

Published in Police Blotter
Friday, 07 June 2019 13:50

Code Blue Eyes New Location

SARATOGA SPRINGS - She was 54 and without a home when she lay across a loading dock, not far from the school where she’d attended classes as a young girl. Her body was discovered the next day, on a frigid December morning on the city’s west side.

A community of residents and clergy, business leaders, politicians and everyday folks were motivated to action that winter of 2013. In quick order, they came together. Their goal: creating a space where people without a home can find shelter during frigid nights, get fed a warm meal, recharge their bodies, then head back out into the light of the next day to try and secure a more stable standing.

A temporary emergency shelter was launched that Christmas Eve at St. Peter’s Parish Center. Since that time, a series of temporary winter shelters have been sited at a variety of venues across town.  From the west-of Broadway Salvation Army building, to the east-of Broadway Soul Saving Station Church, each move faced push-back from some residents who lived in the community where the shelter planned to relocate. Each group expressed a desire for a shelter to be sited, followed with the caveat: just not here.

Soul Saving Station church on Henry Street has hosted a temporary Code Blue shelter the past three years but soon will repurpose the space where the temporary shelter operated, making it not a viable winter option for Code Blue. Enter Presbyterian New England Congregational Church.

 “We are talking about a partnership with Shelters of Saratoga to turn our Nolan House – which is our big, Victorian brick house - into Code Blue,” said Rev. Kate Forer, a Massachusetts native who became Senior Pastor at Presbyterian New England Congregational Church in 2016. “We had a meeting with our congregation this past weekend to introduce the idea to them. And we also had a meeting with our neighbors to introduce the idea to them as well. “

A permanent shelter location was thought to be found in 2017 on Walworth Street, where a Code Blue structure would be built on property belonging to Shelters of Saratoga – the organization who operates the Code Blue program. Local business owner Ed Mitzen, and his wife Lisa announced they would pay the costs for the new, permanent shelter to be built. In September 2018, however, following a lawsuit filed by local residents challenging the proposed shelter expansion as not being in accordance with zoning regulation, a Saratoga County Supreme Court judge nullified previously granted approvals by the city’s Zoning Board of Appeals and the Planning Board which would have allowed the shelter to be built.

Meanwhile, the need for a shelter is strong. Since opening in the 2013-14 winter season and through 2017-18 – the latest figures available, the number of those seeking shelter has increased each year. During the 2017-18 winter season, Code Blue was open 162 nights, served more than 8,000 meals, and provided sleeping quarters for a total of 6,480 overnight stays – or on average, 40 nightly guests.  Presbyterian New England Congregational Church - or PNECC - was also open during 90 of those nights to care for “overflow” guests. 

“The congregation is open to the idea – this is part of the core mission of who we are as a church,” says Rev. Forer.  “For over 40 years, our mission has been about serving vulnerable populations. Our mission statement is that we are working to make God’s love and justice real in our world,” the pastor said.  “This homeless population is already here on our campus and Code Blue does not have a place to go for the 2019-2020 season. We feel it is our duty and obligation to care for our brothers and sisters and to care for them with the necessary services to – not only survive - but to thrive.”

An executive order issued by Gov. Andrew Cuomo directs emergency shelters to operate when temperatures drop below 32 degrees. Code Blue’s temporarily housing at the Soul Saving Station Church often found the 41-bed shelter at full capacity.

Any alterations required to site an emergency shelter at PNECC would be minimal. “The soup kitchen is right next door, so we wouldn’t need a kitchen,” said Karen Gregory, executive director of Shelters of Saratoga. “There would have to be some additions - bathrooms and showers – but there would be very limited changes.” 

The organization anticipates the facility will house 55 beds, which would likely eliminate the need for an off-site overflow emergency center.

“We’re having the conversation. Can this happen at the church? What does it look like, and how do we involve the community members in the conversation?” Gregory says. “We still have lots of steps and lots of conversations (to have) about it.” A preliminary schedule of future meetings is expected to be completed next week.

“We’re still in the talking phase, but I am reaching out to every member of the community, every member of the county, every member in the city in their government positions and saying: please come to the table, have a conversation with us and help us to find a permanent solution for Code Blue,” Gregory said. “It’s desperately needed and there’s a governor’s mandate directing the county do that, but I need the county’s support in order to really move that program and that project forward. There needs to be a collaboration.”

Earlier conversations to potentially site the shelter by Bethesda Episcopal Church on Washington Street didn’t pan out due to the shelter’s proposed location in the building - being on the fourth floor could create issues and obstacles, Gregory says - as well as the rent. “It’s not something we could financially endure and still keep our programming intact,” Gregory says.  The Mitzens remain on board, Gregory added.  “They are strongly supporting Code Blue and are staying on as donors and trying to help us find a solution. They’ve been incredibly generous, kind and patient.”

Discussions regarding PNECC have stipulated that the church would continue to own the Nolan House building and SOS would run the Code Blue program. At some point, a permanent location will still need to be secured.

“I think we have to see how this goes, but I am totally open to a collaboration anywhere in Saratoga that would support this, and I will continue to work to follow the governor’s mandate,” Gregory said. 

Published in News
Thursday, 06 June 2019 13:04

Local Radio Returns to Saratoga Springs

SARATOGA SPRINGS — Saratoga’s Star Radio returns to the area to offer a variety of music and relevant information to listeners living in the Saratoga County region.  In May of 2019 Border Media, LLC and A&J Radio LLC formed a partnership called Saratoga Radio LLC which purchased WSSV-AM, 1160AM, licensed to Mechanicville, and 93.3FM, a new FM translator signal licensed to Saratoga Springs.

“The motivation behind this purchase was the desire to bring local radio back to Saratoga Springs,” said Ricki Lee, owner of Saratoga’s Star Radio. 

Locally owned and operated, Saratoga’s Star Radio will offer a mix of music from the 70s to 90s with a sprinkle of songs from other eras. The target will be an adult contemporary audience age 35+. The station will connect Saratoga area listeners with news and weather, as well as everything that happens in the community they live in.

Fran Dingeman, former General Manager of Star 101.3 FM and a three station AM cluster including 1160am, worked for Anastos Media Group followed by Empire Broadcasting Corporation. Fran has been hired as the new General Manager of Saratoga’s Star Radio to help build the station and drive it forward. Fran is the current owner of Network Saratoga, an event development, marketing and promotions company responsible for well known Saratoga events such as the Longfellows Wedding Show, Saratoga International Flavorfeast, and Black Friday Saratoga. Fran has sixteen years of experience in the radio business and is a 26-year resident of Saratoga Springs.

Published in Neighborhood Buzz
Thursday, 06 June 2019 00:00

June 7 – June 13, 2019

COURT

Karl W. Kimball, 53, of Ballston Spa, was sentenced May 29 to 4 years in state prison and 15 years of post-release supervision, after pleading to attempted sexual abuse in the first-degree, in connection with an incident that occurred in Milton. 

POLICE

Benjamin M. Fedd, 40, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 29 with criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third-degree/narcotic drug intent to sell, and criminal possession of a controlled substance in the third-degree, both felonies, following the execution of a search warrant at 18 Van Dam St. According to the Saratoga Springs Police Department, the search warrant resulted in the seizure of over 23 grams of cocaine. Fedd was arraigned and sent to Saratoga County Jail in lieu of $12,000 cash, or $24,000 bond. 

Kevin Kelly, 38, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 28 with burglary in the third-degree, and petit larceny. 

Steven Boner, 33, of Mechanicville, was charged May 27 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, operating a motor vehicle without inspection certificate, following a traffic stop on Ballston Ave. 

Eric Opuana, 36, of Albany, was charged May 28 with criminal mischief.

Christopher Normile, 22, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 30 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, operating a motor vehicle without insurance, following a traffic stop on Union Avenue. 

Tristan Saunders, 20, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 31 with criminal possession of a controlled substance, criminal impersonation of another person – both misdemeanors, on Washington St. 

Gerard Wichrowski, 27, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 22 with sexual abuse in the third-degree, and forcible touching – both misdemeanors, and aggravated sexual abuse, a felony. 

Joseph Paz, 54, of Branchville, NJ was charged May 22 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, and operating a motor vehicle without insurance, following a traffic stop on Hamilton Street. 

Ruben Acevedo, 37, of Ballston Spa, was charged May 22 with criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh-degree, following a traffic stop on Geyser Road. 

Diane Foglietta, 60, of Queensbury, was charged May 23 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, following a traffic stop on Loughberry Road. 

Devon Webb, 30, of Queensbury, was charged May 24 with harassment, violating an order of protection felony, and aggravated family offense felony. 

David Arrington, 22, of Troy, was charged May 25 with criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh-degree, and unlawful possession of marijuana, following a traffic stop on Spring Street. 

Fard Battiste, 22, of Troy, was charged May 25 with criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh-degree, following a traffic stop on Spring St. 

Craig Earle, 32, of Albany, was charged May 25 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, a felony, failing to stop at a stop sign, operating a motor vehicle without insurance, having a registration suspended, following a traffic stop on Broadway. 

Andrew Leggiero, 34, of Patchogue, was charged May 26 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, failing to stop at a stop sign, following a traffic stop on Union Ave.

Corey Clow, 48, of Troy, was charged May 26 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle – a felony, equipment violation, and misdemeanor DWI, following a traffic stop on West Ave. 

Published in Police Blotter
SARATOGA SPRINGS/ RUSSIA — For the second year in a row the EuroChem Cup, one of the world’s leading ice hockey tournaments for 10 to 12-year-old players have invited coaches from the capital region to compile a team to represent the United States. Three players on the team – The Albany Capitols – are Saratoga Springs locals. 

 

“The experience was spectacular. I don’t think any kid can attend a tournament like that - it doesn’t happen,” said coach and parent Styles Bridges. “The show they put on, the experience that they have; even though we travel all around North America for hockey tournaments, you can’t pay to go to a tournament like this. They go above and beyond to make them feel like it’s the little kid Olympics for hockey.”

 

When first asked to participate in 2018, the coaches thought it was a spam e-mail; they couldn’t believe such an opportunity would land at their feet. After some research on the validity of the tournament, they placed a team together. This year, when the invitation presented again, they were ready to put a team together. 

 

“We were looking for kids that are gonna go hard, are great kids. When you’re there, these kids all come from hockey academies where they live away from home and they are used to being on the road, staying by themselves,” said Bridges.  “Whereas Americans we typically do not do that - parents are highly involved with all their traveling activities. It is a big change for them, so it has to be the right kid.” 

 

This experience was more than just a hockey tournament, it was an opportunity for kids to experience how other kids their ages live in other countries. 

 

“Our job is to get them ready to represent the country; we want to play at a high level, that’s why we’re here practicing harder, but really it’s about this kind of citizen to citizen type of relationships,” said Brad Chartrand, parent, coach and former player for the L.A. Kings. “We play hard on the ice, but off the ice, we’re there to develop hopefully lifelong friendships. Now with technology, some of the things kids are using - Google translate - there’s much more communication available to the kids over there.” 

 

This was the first time the team goalie Adam Sherman was participating in the EuroChem Cup, and before departure was prepared to say the least. 

 

“I’m feeling confident with my time because we’ve been working really hard over the past month. I’m excited,” said Sherman. 

 

For veteran EuroChem Players Hunter Bridges and Liam Chartrand, the pre-travel excitement didn’t diminish. 

 

“My favorite part is obviously playing with my teammates and especially ones that I play with my regular team. I can’t wait to represent our country again,” said Hunter.

 

 Cultural exchange is certainly a factor that not only parents were eager to see, but the kids were looking forward to experiencing as well. 

 

“I’m most excited about playing the new teams that are supposed to be coming like Italy and China. Getting to be able to represent my country - it’s just a great experience overall,” said Liam. “They teach us some words, we teach them. It’s just great to be able to meet people from other countries cause you get to know how they live and they get to know how we live.” 

 

The EuroChem tournament is another example of how sports unite, educates and presents influential opportunities beyond imagination. 
Published in Sports
Thursday, 30 May 2019 14:12

Kelsey Briddell: Athlete of the Week

SARATOGA SPRINGS — Former Blue Streak field hockey player continues a prosperous career with the USA Women’s Field Hockey team. 
Kelsey Briddell first began playing field hockey at the age of 12 when her friend convinced her to try out for the team in the 7th grade. Briddell couldn’t have imagined that something she did on a whim would direct the following years of her life. 
She was a natural, as she made the junior varsity team in the eighth grade and varsity team in the ninth. 
“When I was in high school, I didn’t even think I was going to get a scholarship to college,” said Briddell. 
But on to the women’s field hockey at U Albany she went. As her four-year hockey career was coming to an end, Briddell looked forward to grad school and pursuing a career in the medical field. However, something inside her told her that she wasn’t turning in her hockey stick just yet. 
“When I played my last game (in college) and realized I had no eligibility left and I wasn’t going to be able to play anymore, I was devastated. I thought ‘this couldn’t be the end of it’. So, I took a leap of faith and tried out for the US team and made the development squad and kept going with it because I’m not ready to stop yet,” 
said Briddel. 
Not only is Briddell a midfielder for the USA development squad, but she is also a trainer for the USA Women’s National team.  
Over the years Briddell has trained young athletes and she encourages her young players to “Just go for it. Don’t be afraid of doing what you love. No matter what…to go for it with everything that you have, and just put everything that you have and to use your heart and your head.”
Field hockey has given Briddell more opportunities than she could have imagined. From attending college to traveling the world to mentoring the youth. She attributes this success not only to her self-motivation but also the ongoing support she’s received from her family and coaches. 
“Every coach that I’ve ever had has had an impact on me, in some way,” said Briddell. “I wouldn’t be here without all the support that I’ve had on this journey."
Published in Sports
Thursday, 30 May 2019 00:00

May 31 – June 6, 2019

COURT

Jeremy J. Defibaugh, 26, of Ballston Spa, pleaded May 24 to criminal possession of a controlled substance in the fourth-degree, a felony. Sentencing scheduled for July 19. 

Paul R. Ashdown, Jr., 41, of Mechanicville, pleaded May 24 to attempted criminal possession of stolen property in the third-degree, a felony, in Malta. Sentencing scheduled for July 12. 

Travis R. Broe, 29, of Queensbury, was sentenced May 24 to 1 year in jail, after pleading to aggravated DWI, regarding an incident that occurred in Northumberland. 

POLICE

Aaron Benware, 48, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 14 with criminal mischief in the fourth-degree, a misdemeanor, on South Broadway.

Sean Hinningan, 30, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 14 with resisting arrest, a misdemeanor, on Congress Street. 

Ethan Dunn, 18, of Greenfield, was charged May 15 with grand larceny/ credit card in the fourth-degree, a felony, on Lake Avenue. 

Roy Roberts, 50, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 15 with criminal mischief in the third-degree, a felony, on Walworth Street. 

John Dobbins, 28, of Virginia Beach, Virginia, was charged May 16 with misdemeanor DWI, aggravated DWI, and speeding, on South Broadway, following a traffic stop. 

Kevin Kelly, 38, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 16 with petit larceny, and criminal trespass in the third-degree – both misdemeanors, on Railroad Place.  Kelly was additionally charged May 18 with burglary in the third-degree, a felony, petit larceny, and criminal trespass in the third-degree, on Ballston Avenue. 

Matthias Perrault, 22, of Corinth, was charged May 16 on a warrant with three counts of criminal sale of a controlled substance in the fifth-degree. 

Alyssa Bridge, 26, of Ballston Spa, was charged May 16 with petit larceny, on Caroline Street. 

Victor Maffetone, 33, of Northville, was charged May 17 with criminal possession of a controlled substance in the seventh-degree, a misdemeanor, on Woodlawn Avenue. 

James Bowes, 62, of Cairo, was charged May 17 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, a misdemeanor, and two driving violations, following a traffic stop on Woodlawn Avenue. 

Luis Marin, 47, of Ballston Spa, was charged May 18 with criminal trespass in the third-degree, a misdemeanor, on Jefferson Street. 

Robert Lawrence, 47, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 18 with assault in the third-degree, a misdemeanor, on Washington Street. 

Michael Martin, 48, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 18 with aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, a misdemeanor, and speeding, on Ballston Avenue. 

Charles Usas, 40, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 19 with misdemeanor DWI, aggravated DWI, and refusing to take a breath test, on Congress Street. 

Randy Jones, 51, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 19 with resisting arrest, a misdemeanor, disorderly conduct, and unlawful possession of marijuana, on Broadway. 

Johanna Piusz, 35, of Albany, was charged May 18 with resisting arrest, and criminal trespass in the third-degree – both misdemeanors, on Broadway. 

Darrick Conners, 45, of Saratoga Springs, was charged May 20 with burglary in the third-degree, a felony, and petit larceny, a misdemeanor, on Ballston Avenue. 

Published in Police Blotter

SARATOGA SPRINGS – A rollicking piano, nicely harnessed by a sturdy rhythm section, channels alongside the vocal sass of Annie Rosen and launches into Tommy Johnson’s 1928 “Big Road Blues,” introducing the sixth album by Capital/Saratoga region favorites Annie and the Hedonists.

Produced by Grammy award winner, Joel Moss and recorded at the legendary Dreamland Studio in Woodstock, the new album - “Bring it On Home” – features 12 vintage blues and jazz tracks from the 1920s through the 1950s, as well as a trio of original contemporary blues songs.    

On Friday May 31, the band will stage a record release party at Caffe Lena.

The Hedonists - comprised of core members Annie and Jonny Rosen, Donald Young and Peter Davis - are accompanied by drummer Jerry Marotta,  who spent two decades Jerry dividing his time between recording and touring with Peter Gabriel, Daryl Hall and John Oates, Tears for Fears, Joan Armatrading, Paul McCartney, and countless others. With “Bring it On Home,” the band is amiably assisted by guest musicians John Sebastian (yes, that one), Dave Davies (no, not that one), and Randy Reinhart. 

“This record differs from the other five,” says guitarist Jonny Rosen, “in that we decided to focus on two related genres of music, as opposed to our previous albums which were an eclectic mix of folk, country, bluegrass, blues and jazz.”  

The 12-song release features tasty renditions of a mid-20th century Parisian waltz (“Under Paris Skies”), a cornet and trombone mating that weaves through the sultry 1924 tune “Prescription for the Blues,” and a musical re-make of the Depression-Era protest song “The Panic Is Own,” whose updated lyrics include themes of the plight of the immigrant, the (lack of) gun control, rising oceans, Russian hackings and the ever-widening gap of economic inequality in a new world.

“Bring it On Home” also features a smattering of original tunes – from the Davis and Moss co-penned 12-bar blues femme homage “Bring It On Home To Mama,” to the love lost sorrow-cholic “Long Distance Call,” and “Who’d be knocking (Knocking on my door/ so late at night)” penned by Davies about one particularly strange pre-dawn awakening when the songwriter was startled from his slumber to find a stranger standing over his bed.  

Annie & the Hedonists album release concert will stake place 8 p.m. Friday May 31 at Caffé Lena, 47 Phila St. Special guests: Randy Reinhart and Dave Davies.  For reservations or more information, call 518-583-0022 or visit Caffe Lena. org. 

Published in Entertainment

SARATOGA SPRINGS – In a unanimous 5-0 vote, the City Council on May 21 adopted a resolution in support of the Paris Climate Agreement. 

“This resolution represents the city’s commitment to the Paris Climate Agreement, in which nation’s around the world recognize the threat of global warming and are committed to take action,“ said Finance Commissioner Michele Madigan, who introduced the resolution during the City Council’s meeting Tuesday night. 

“From the Spa Solar Park to the in-process plans to ensure city buildings are more energy efficient, the City Council has already taken a variety of proactive steps that recognize and address our concerns about climate change,” said Madigan, adding the future-looking statement that with the city’s 2020 budget, she intends to increase the city’s financial commitment to sustainability - specifically referencing a desire to increase the number of electric vehicle charging stations on city-owned property as well as modernizing the city’s fleet of vehicles.

The Spa Solar Park - a 7,992 panel, 2.5-megawatt solar array built on the city's former Weibel Avenue landfill – was energized in August 2017. As of February 2019, 3.82 million kilowatt hours were generated providing more than $66,000 of budgetary savings for the city.

The resolution, Madigan said, commits the city to continue its efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming. “The resolution references the creation of a Climate Action Plan and we are currently having internal discussions on how best to proceed,” she said.

The council subsequently unanimously also approved a Local Law to establish a sustainable energy loan program in the city, as well as authorizing the mayor to sign a municipal agreement with the energy improvement corporation ("Energize NY Open C-PACE Financing Program").

The Paris Agreement was adopted in December 2015, according to the United Nations Treaty Collection. In June 2017, President Donald Trump announced that the United States would withdraw from the Paris climate accord - the procedures of which may begin in November 2019.  Earlier this month, the U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation aimed at preventing Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris climate accord.

New York has mandated a statewide reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by the year 2050. 

Published in News
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