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Thursday, 13 July 2017 12:32

Under Development

SARATOGA SPRINGS – The city landscape is poised to look a vastly difference place in the near future as a variety of high-profile development projects draw closer to construction approval.

A good number of the projects listed below are in the Land Use Board approval phase and slated to be heard by the city Planning Board this week. A list of upcoming meetings – and in some cases, meeting agenda items - hosted by the Planning Board, Design Review Commission, and Zoning Board of Appeals, as well as the City Council may be viewed at: http://www.saratoga-springs.org/.      

 

West Avenue Mixed-Use Development

Ten new buildings, a five-story hotel, more than 400 residential units and nearly 30,000 square feet of retail space may soon rise from the rural landscape of the city’s west side, adjacent to the Saratoga Springs train station.  A special use permit and a site plan review for the mixed-use development are being sought for the project. Two separate yet adjoining proposals have been submitted.

The Station Park project calls for two buildings to be dedicated as a mixed-use space with each building housing 36 residential units, and a total of 22,000 square feet of retail space. The 72 residential units would be for-sale condominiums. Additional development would include two buildings - each providing 57 units for senior housing and 33 units for senior assisted care, a 110-to-120 unit five-story hotel and spa, a pool and fitness center, and a free-standing building with an additional 6,200 square feet of retail space. Nearly 600 parking spaces would span across the location to cater to residents, retail workers and shoppers.

The second proposal, submitted by the Missouri-based Vecino Group seeks to develop one three-story building and three four-story buildings to stand just east of the Station Park proposal and near the Washington Street post office. The 160 apartment units contained within the proposal seem to fall in “workforce,” or “affordable” housing categories.

 

West Ave plan.png

Code Blue Emergency Homeless Shelter

A proposed 6,400 square foot emergency homeless shelter is slated to be sited on Walworth Street, adjacent to the Shelters of Saratoga. Most recently, an appeal filed by nearly two dozen residents in opposition to the building of a permanent Code Blue emergency homeless shelter at that location was rejected in a 7-0 vote by the city ZBA. The project is seeking a special use permit for a neighborhood rooming house within the Urban Residential District.

 

South Broadway/ Saratoga Diner

The long-standing horse atop the Saratoga Diner on South Broadway has been removed for safekeeping and a proposal under consideration would see the demolition of the diner and the development on the three-acre parcel of 110 single and two-bedroom “affordable” apartment units, two floors of commercial space, and a new business incubator collaboratively partnered by Saratoga Economic Development Corporation and Saratoga CoWorks.

It is anticipated new construction will start next spring and the structure operational by the summer of 2019.

The project at the southern gateway to the city would include 46 one-bedroom units and 64 two-bedroom units, 7,000 square feet of retail space on the ground floor, 4,000 square feet of service establishment space and a 7,500 square-foot food beverage or brew pub, which will act as a visible anchor on South Broadway.  Streetscape improvements will include street lamps, landscaping, and a total of 273 parking spaces for resident and commercial parking uses. The second floor will house 17,000 square feet of commercial space where two new tenants are expected to join SEDC’s 10,000 square foot “incubator,” a flexible co-working space to be inhabited by a rotating group of entrepreneurs and early-stage growth business teams.

Universal Preservation Hall Renovation

The historic building on Washington Street, constructed in 1871, is seeking a site plan approval. Plans call for UPH to close for renovations this fall and re-open one year later as an acoustically perfect theater-in-the-round showcase that will hold about 750 people.

Henry Street Condominiums

Preliminary plans call for the development of a five-story condominium building to house 30 units with 70 total bedrooms to be located at 120 Henry St., on subdivided land adjacent to the Four Seasons market.   

Pink Palace Goes Condo

The Skidmore College dormitory commonly referred to as the “pink palace” has been demolished and the construction of The Residences on Union Avenue is in full swing. The five-building residential property with on-site parking will feature one, two and three-bedroom residences priced from $689,900 to $895,500 and are planned for occupancy by March 2018.

 

12,13.4 - adelphi.jpg

The Adelphi Hotel

 “We aren’t just a hotel. We’re going for an upscale first-class hotel experience that currently doesn’t exist in Saratoga Springs,” Toby Mildé, president of Richbell Capital and RBC Construction said last November.

Richbell Capital purchased the building in 2012 for $4.5 million, and early renovations estimates ranged from $6 to $7 million. Five years later, that restoration cost is now about $30 million – offset by the use of state and federal rehabilitation credits. The date targeting the re-opening of the renovated 32-room luxury boutique hotel on Broadway has been delayed numerous times. The most recently scheduled opening was set for July 1, but this week laborers continued to work on the project.  

Mildé could not be reached for comment. The July 10 issue of the Albany Business Review quoted Mildé as saying he anticipated opening the doors of the historic hotel during the second week of August.

    

Published in News
Thursday, 06 July 2017 14:39

Ballston Spa Teacher Reaches for the Stars

BALLSTON SPA – Ankie Meuwissen, a science teacher from Ballston Spa High School, recently completed a special program that will help her to bring the stars to her students.

From June 15-19, Meuwissen took part in the Honeywell Educators in Space Academy (HESA) program in Huntsville, Ala. The program gives educators from across the country a chance to learn more about space and space-related technologies, so that they can ideally bring back the things they learned to share with their students. Meuwissen mentioned that there were also activities focused on incorporated engineering design, which she said would be “much needed from our graduates.”

The HESA program was created in 2004 by the Honeywell Company in conjunction with the U.S. Space & Rocket Center with the intention of helping math and science teachers become more effective STEM instructors. This year, Meuwissen was among over 200 other educators from 45 states and 33 countries. Over the years, 2,776 instructors have taken part in HESA, from 52 U.S. states and territories and 62 countries, with official estimates putting the numbers of students impacted by the program through their instructors at over 3 million.

At HESA, Meuwissen went through around 45 hours of classroom and laboratory instruction. Some of the activities that she took part in included a jet simulation, scenario-based space missions, land and water survival training, interactive flight dynamics programs, and more. Some of the activities that stood out to Meuwissen the most were mock water landing drills and a simulation of gravity on the Moon, which is about 1/6 the gravity found on Earth. Attendees were also able to hear from important pioneers in the realm of space travel, including space flight advocate Ed Buckbee, “Rocket Boys” author Homer Hickam, and astronaut Clayton Anderson.

Meuwissen said that she first heard about the program from “a friend of a friend,” and thought that it sounded both interesting and like something that would have meaningful benefits for her students.

“I learned sometime in the spring,” Meuwissen said about getting the opportunity to attend HESA. “I was really excited! What a wonderful opportunity!”

Meuwissen’s students were initially excited to hear about her involvement with the program, however, she said that the now-previous year’s students did not really see any benefit from it. Next year’s class will be the one to experience the significant changes in her curriculum.

“Currently I have plans to alter my bottle rocket project and incorporate better engineering practices into it,” Meuwissen said. “I also want to create a lesson around thermal heat shields into my physics class, and challenge students to keep an egg-stronaut safe as it re-enters Earth's atmosphere.”

Meuwissen has been with the Ballston Spa school district for five years and currently teaches astronomy, physics, and earth science.

Photos provided.

Published in Education

SARATOGA TODAY — Overcoming repeated bouts with rain, the 5th Annual Saratoga Lacrosse Shootout brought some of the best high school lacrosse teams from across the country together at Gavin Park for a weekend of high intensity competition. Taking place from June 30-July 2, the event saw teams mostly from New York, a good number from New England, and a couple from as far away as Arkansas. These teams competed for a Championship title, and the wider event also featured professional player clinics, coaching clinics, opening night ceremonies and festivities, a players-only lounge, 3-vs.-3 mini lacrosse tournament, Mazzone Catering, and a vendor village.

All photos by www.PhotoAndGraphic.com

Published in Sports
Thursday, 06 July 2017 14:20

Local Sports Physician Celebrates 35 Years

SARATOGA SPRINGS — Dr. David Gabay still occasionally finds his dreams drifting back to when he was fresh out of college.

“It’s funny, I still have the dreams where I wake up, and I’m still in chiropractic college and I have three months to graduate, and I don’t know where I’m gonna go,” Gabay said. “And now it’s 35 years later.”

Gabay first established his private chiropractic practice in Saratoga Springs back in May of 1982, just a few months after finishing school in December of 1981. He had completed his undergraduate degree at Stony Brook, and his graduate school had been the New York Chiropractic College, which was then located in Long Island. He initially stressed about which direction to take his career early on, not sure whether to go work some place as an associate, or to start up his own practice. Despite offers from respected chiropractors in Manhattan and Long Island, he followed the urgings of family friend Robert D. Scott to come check out the Saratoga area for a potential practice.

After staying with Scott for around two weeks, Gabay made the decision to take a risk on his own practice, starting out with a location on Myrtle Street. Having grown up in the Pine Bush section of Albany, it was something of a homecoming for him. Now, many years and accomplishments later, Gabay’s practice is still going strong on the second floor of a building on Maple Avenue, just across from the middle school tennis courts.

Gabay recalled an amusing exchange from the early days of his practice. Two of his first patients, local golf enthusiasts Mike McGraw and Denny Farone, were interested in checking out “the new guy in town.” Both men were in need of a chiropractor, but expressed concern over getting treatment from someone as young as Gabay.

“To this day, Mike remembers my response,” Gabay said. “I said, ’Well, do you want somebody who’s old or do you want somebody that’s good?’”

Gabay began to get involved in sports medicine in 1994 after Dr. Philip Santiago, the first ever chiropractor chosen to be part of the U.S. Olympic Team Medical Staff, established the Certified Chiropractic Sports Physician program to offer specialized training to chiropractors looking to work with professional athletes and Olympians. Gabay completed his certification over the course of three years, going to Meadowlands area of N.J. one weekend each month for classes and hands-on instruction. From time to time, he worked with the New York Giants while working towards his certification, occasionally attending games to help the players on-site.

A few years later, Gabay went to work at the United States Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, alongside a number of other professionals from a wide variety of medical disciplines. His and everyone else’s job there was to help get as many injured athletes off the bench as possible in time for them to compete in the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, Ga. Gabay stayed in the position right up until the athletes shipped out for the games. He was offered the opportunity to attend the games, but ut as a solo practitioner, Gabay could not be away from his practice for another 3 weeks.

Since then, Gabay has worked with U.S. bobsledding, skeleton, and luge teams at the Olympic Training Center in Lake Placid, and recently procured funding and casted orthotics for Bobsled, athletes.

Some of the teams that Gabay worked with included the U.S. wrestling teams, the judo and taekwondo teams, the weightlifting team, the shooting team, and more. Some of the notable individuals that Gabay worked with during this time included three-time wrestling gold medalist and future Edinboro University athletic director Bruce Baumgartner, and gold medalist and future WWE performer Kurt Angle.

In his spare time, Gabay likes to work on restoring classic cars, for which he has a garage set up out back of the building where his practice is. Often on the weekends, he gets together with a group of friends to work on his latest restoration project.

(UPDATE, 11:42 a.m., 7/7: This online article has been changed with minor corrections, and so differs from the print article.)

Published in Sports
Thursday, 06 July 2017 14:03

July 7th - July 13th

COURTS 

James J. Garafalo, 21, of Saratoga Springs, was sentenced on June 23 to 2 to 4 years in state prison, after pleading to felony criminal contempt in connection with an incident that took place in Wilton. 

Ryan M. Jabaut, 22, pleaded on June 23 to attempting to disseminate indecent materials to a minor, a felony, in connection with an incident that took place in Moreau. Sentencing is scheduled for Aug. 18. 

Gregory L. Lyons, 58, of Gansevoort, pleaded on June 26 to felony DWI, in connection with an incident that took place in Moreau. Sentencing is scheduled for July 17. 

Nicholas J. Murtlow, 28, of Middle Grove, pleaded on June 26 to felony DWI, in connection with an incident that took place in Saratoga Springs. Sentencing is scheduled for Aug. 21. 

James L. Mosher, 51, of Moreau, was sentenced June 27 to 10 years of probation, after pleading to first degree sexual abuse, a felony. 

POLICE

Jeffrey D. Place, age 23, of Ballston Spa, was charged on June 27 with felony reckless endangerment, and the misdemeanors DWAI drugs, and reckless driving, following a motor vehicle collision at Saratoga Village Mobile Home Park in the town of Milton. Place is accused of operating his motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs and having collided with another vehicle occupied by two children, causing one of them to be ejected.  A third child who was standing outside of the other vehicle was allegedly struck by Place as well.  All three children were transported to Saratoga Hospital for evaluation and treatment of non-life-threatening injuries. The children are between two and 12 years of age. Place was arraigned and sent to the Saratoga County Jail in lieu of bail, or bond, according to the Saratoga County Sheriff’s Office. 

Eric J. McIntosh, age 27, of South Glens Falls, was charged on June 23 with felony assault and felony criminal possession of a weapon, after allegedly striking a person known to him to the head with a shovel and intentionally causing serious physical injury.  The victim was transported to Saratoga Hospital for treatment of serious but non-life-threatening injuries. McIntosh was arraigned and sent to Saratoga County Jail without bail.

Gregory Desilva, age 56, Schenectady, was charged on June 24 with attempted assault and menacing – both misdemeanors. 

Adam M. Winnie, age 27, Albany, was charged on June 24 with the misdemeanors: DWI, criminal possession of a controlled substance and refusing a pre-screen test. 

Marie T. Buser, age 28, Clifton Park, was charged on June 24 with misdemeanor DWI, and unlawfully driving on or across sidewalk.

Christopher R. Otto, age 48, Saratoga Springs, was charged on June 24 with misdemeanor DWI.   

Keith C. Owen, age 40, Glens Falls, was charged on June 24 with criminal possession of marijuana - a misdemeanor.

Joseph P. Frey, age 65, Saratoga Springs, was charged on June 23 with misdemeanor DWI.

Brian S. Wallin, age 27, New Brighton, MN, was charged on June 23 with misdemeanor DWI. 

Robert C. Walton, age 31, Schenectady, was charged on June 23 with felony DWI as a second offense, and refusing a pre-screen test. 

Sean D. Bradford, age 28, Saratoga Springs, was charged on June 22 with criminal possession of marijuana - a misdemeanor.

John S. Stevens, age 53, Rexford, was charged on June 22 with misdemeanor DWI, felony aggravated DWI, and endangering the welfare of a child. The felony charge is based upon the suspicion of having a 15-year-old child in the car at the time.   

Robert P. Longdaue, age 60, Argyle, was charged on June 22 with misdemeanor DWI.

Jolene F. Munger, age 32, Saratoga Springs, was charged on June 22 with misdemeanor DWI.     

Tess A. Morency, age 25, Saratoga Springs, was charged on June 22 with criminal possession of a controlled substance and criminally using drug paraphernalia – both misdemeanors.

Wendy A. Slater, age 50, Gansevoort, was charged on June 22 with criminal contempt.

Stephen R. Joachinson, age 25, Hudson, Florida, was charged on June 22 with unlawful possession of marijuana, and two misdemeanor counts criminal possession of a controlled substance. 

Malia K. Graciani, age 20, Gainesville, Florida, was charged on June 22 with unlawful possession of marijuana, and four misdemeanor counts criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Kyle L. Branagan, age 18, Ballston Spa, was charged on June 21 with aggravated unlicensed operation misdemeanor, and failed to yield at intersection. 

Marc A.  Meyer, age 45, Kinderhook, was charged on June 21 with assault in the second-degree, a felony. 

Published in Police Blotter
Thursday, 06 July 2017 13:57

Hot Tuna Mesmerizes on Stage at SPAC

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Jorma Kaukonen stepped into the sunlight and rode an E chord for all it was worth: 

“Down in the mine,

circled ‘round the diamond,

Serpent of your expectations,

Sleeps a nervous dream…”

Electric Hot Tuna – these days a power trio led by longtime bandmates Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady, and aided amply by the grounding beats of drummer Justin Gulp, came to Saratoga July 3 and staged a show at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center in support of the Tedeschi Trucks Band, and the Wood Brothers. 

Hot Tuna delivered a seven-song, 45-minute set that came full circle, commencing with “Serpent of Dreams” and concluding with “Hit Single #1” – adjacent vinyl tracks on the band’s 1975 album “America’s Choice.”

It was 49 years, nearly to the day, when Kaukonen and Casady graced the front cover of Life Magazine beneath the headline: “Music That’s Hooked The Whole Vibrating World.”  Perhaps best known for their respective roles in helping create the Jefferson Airplane’s signature sound – try imagining songs like “White Rabbit” sans Casady’s "Bolero" bass, or “Somebody To Love” and “Lather” without Kaukonen’s soaring guitaristry - the Hot Tuna duo has done well in creating their own legacy during the past 45-plus years, alternating between the moody electric wailing of Kaukonen’s wheezing guitar and elaborate acoustic fingerpickings, and Casady’s melody bass. Add to that hipping an entire generation of guitar players to the music of Robert Johnson and Jelly Roll Morton, Jimmy Reed and Rev. Gary Davis.

Much of that legacy was on full display at SPAC, where the band’s set began with a pair of acoustic numbers and took off in earnest when Kaukonen strapped on his electric Firebird that bent through the wave of a Wah-Wah flange and delivered a string-bending swoon of vintage psychedelia, blown in on a breeze from the west coast of America.

The three-piece ensemble allows ample space for each instrument to be well-defined by the human ear, and as Kaukonen displayed a mental fixation on his fretboard delivering his searing notes, Casady plunked, boomed, slid and slapped out the low tones on his Wine Red hollow-body bass, his undulating eyebrows rising and falling with the plonk of the beat.

“The last time I remember that Jack and I were here was in ’89 on the (Jefferson) Airplane reunion tour,” announced Kaukonen, a black Harley T-shirt clinging to his 76-year-old frame. Truth be told, the band had been here with The Further Festival in the late ‘90s and on a bill with the Allman Brothers in 2000, but no one seemed to mind the historical misstep inside the amphitheater and out on the summer lawn where fans of the music swooned and grooved, transported to some heavenly place in a world of song. 

Published in Entertainment

SARATOGA SPRINGS - City police have issued the following travel advisories for July 4: 

Firecracker 4: The race starts at 9 a.m. at Broadway at Ellsworth Jones.

The road closures will start with Broadway (Van Dam Street to Lake Ave) at 8:30 am. At about 8:50 am all of Broadway (Van Dam Street to Circular Street) will be closed. This should be until about 9:15 am. In addition, once the race has started, Excelsior Springs Ave, Excelsior Ave (from Veteran’s Way to High Rock), Maple Ave (High Rock to Lake Ave), and East Ave (Lake Ave to Rte 50) will be closed to accommodate runners. This will last from about 9 am until about 10:30 am. Lake Avenue traffic (both ways) in the area of Salem Drive can also expect delays during the race.

½ Mile Race & All- American Parade: Broadway, from Van Dam Street to Circular Street, will close at 10:45 am until about noon.

No traffic will be permitted on Broadway during that time frame. Travelers will find side streets intersecting Broadway in the affected area closed off. Minimal crossing will be allowed at the Lake Avenue/ Church Street intersection of Broadway, however travelers should expect delays there as well.
CDTA bus stops along Broadway will not be accessible.

Fireworks in Congress Park:  Fireworks are slated to go off about 9:15 pm.

Spring Street (Circular to Broadway) and Putnam Street (Phila Street to Spring Street) will be closed from 6 pm until about 11 pm. The Spring Street parking lot will not be available for parking all day long.

Published in News

 

WILTON – It is a weekday morning inside the Wilton Mall. Wedged between one shop that sports women’s summer fashions and another displaying torn men’s jeans, a series of piano rolls tumble into the hallway from behind the blackened windows of an abandoned retail space,

Inside the space where the piano melody flows, The Moll – portrayed by Ginger Costa-Jackson - and Bugs – played by Andy Papas - are rehearsing the opening scene of the controversial 1937 opera “The Cradle Will Rock.”  

”I’d like to give you a hun-dred bucks, but I only got thir-tee cents,” Bugs proclaims in a speak-song voice, hoisting a cigar to his mouth beneath a brim-backwards baseball cap that rests atop his head.  

“Make it a dollar,” sings The Moll, tugging at the fringes of her black shawl. There is no negotiating.

“That’s all I got. Thirty cents,” Bugs replies. Lawrence Edelson, the director, interrupts the scene. 

“There needs to be more of a beat. There. Punctuation marks!” he says. A half-dozen or so others in the cavernous room fiddle with scripts, binders, the musical score. Rows of empty store shelves give off a yellow hue. A pair of benches sit in the middle of a floor spiked for blocking. Someone strikes the keys of the standup piano, and Bugs and The Moll begin again.

“That’s so much better,” Edelson says, finally pleased the scene is played to perfection. “Burning with tension!”

The show, “The Cradle Will Rock,” opens July 9 at the Spa Little Theater in the Saratoga Spa State Park.  It is a piece that has historical implications.

“It’s remarkably timely considering it was written 80 years ago. It could have been written yesterday and you’d never know it,” says Edelson, matter-of-factly. “It speaks to contemporary audiences on its own terms in a vibrant way.”

Trained as a singer and having professionally performed as a dancer, this summer marks Edelson’s third as artistic and general director for Opera Saratoga.  Edelson chooses the repertoire, puts all the production teams and the casting together, chooses the directors and conductors and casts all the singers. Opera Saratoga’s summer season – which opens this weekend - features performances of “Falstaff,” “Beauty and the Beast,” and Marc Blitzstein’s “The Cradle Will Rock” – the latter which Edelson is personally directing and choreographing. 

“It’s about a wealthy businessman who is buying his way up in society. He is buying off the church, he is buying off the newspaper, buying off the university and the hospital, buying off all these different parts of society for his own gain. At the same time, he’s fighting the unions. And when you look at the headlines today…”

Edelson resists the temptation that was engaged by his theatrical peers at The Public Theater in New York City, whose current staging of Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” portrays a very modern-day character resembling Donald Trump.

“The main character, Mr. Mister, one could easily tie him into a Trumpian character. But, that’s not the approach I’m taking. My job as a director is to present the story and the music to the best of my abilities the way the authors intended it,” Edelson explains. As is, the piece set in Steeltown U.S.A. drew controversy all its own when it premiered in pre-World War II America when its pro-union plot was feared as being too radical.  

“It was actually shut down by the government on its opening night in 1937. The government had locked up the theater with all the costumes and the orchestral parts which they couldn’t get out. Orson Welles was the original director and John Houseman the producer. They rented a piano and moved it north 20 blocks and put it on a stage,” Edelson said.

“In an incredibly ironic act, the actors’ union forbid the performers from performing onstage - in a show that was pro-union! So Blitzstein started to play the piece on the piano onstage, to sing through it himself. What was extraordinary was the members of the cast sitting in the audience rose up one-by-one and started to perform from their seats. It became one of the most legendary evenings in all of music theater history.” 

Controversy aside, the artistic result is that the original orchestration created by Marc Blitzstein – a frequent resident of the Yaddo arts colony in Saratoga Springs – is often neglected and almost always presented with just a piano.

“It only been performed twice with Blitzstein’s original orchestration. It has been 57 years since this piece has been done anywhere in the world the way Blitzstein intended. It’s really going to be a historically significant event for Saratoga Springs,” Edelson said. “And I think this cast is quite extraordinary. I don’t know if the piece has ever been sung this well before, quite frankly. I think audiences are going to be electrified by what they hear onstage.”         

“The Cradle Will Rock,” with music, book and lyrics by Marc Blitzstein will be staged 7:30 p.m. Sunday, July 9, 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 11, 7:30 p.m. Thursday July 13 and 2 p.m. on Sunday, July 16.

 “I don’t think about opera in a bubble. For me, opera is this amazing synthesis of the arts. as much theater as it is music and visual arts and dance, and for me that’s what makes opera exciting,” Edelson said. “We do one opera every year that is a masterpiece from the classical repertoire. This year that is ‘Falstaff’ – one of the greatest operas ever written. I think audiences whose tastes lean towards traditional opera are really going to love this but it’s also a great comic piece and a great introduction to opera. It’s one of the pieces you just laugh out loud at.” “Falstaff,” with music by Giuseppe Verdi and libretto by Arrigo Boito will be staged by Saratoga Opera on July 1, 6, 10 and 15.  

 “We’ve also been doing works that incorporate dance and movement – this being such a city that has an appreciation in dance. Last year we did the Philip Glass piece, ‘The Witches of Venice.’ This year we’ll be doing a piece by André Grétry, who was a Belgian composer. I chose it because it has dance and movement in it and it’s also a fairy tale which people know the story of. It’s a great introduction to opera for family audiences and a great way to introduce kids to opera.  This particular production incorporates a lot of puppetry, which is a new element, something we haven’t done before.”

“Beauty and The Beast,” with music by André Grétry, libretto by Jean Francois Marmontel, will be staged July 2, 8 and 14. For tickets and more information of Opera Saratoga’s summer festival season, , go to: http://www.operasaratoga.org/.

Published in Entertainment
Thursday, 29 June 2017 17:01

Notes from City Hall: Stages of Development

Officials Provide Update of Three City “Workforce Housing” Projects

Saratoga Springs' Mayor Joanne Yepsen, County Chamber President Todd Shimkus and the city's Housing Task Force, led by Cheryl Hage-Perez, held a press conference Tuesday to provide an update regarding three “site-specific” workforce housing proposals in the city. The three projects, independent of one another, symbolize a starting point in addressing affordable housing needs for area residents who work in the city but are unable to secure housing within its borders.

The three workforce housing solutions are slated to be developed at: South Broadway on the site currently occupied by the Saratoga Diner (110 to 120 one and two-bedroom rental units); on vacant land adjacent to the rail station on West Avenue (120 units), and in a new building adjacent to the Stonequist Apartments on South Federal street (158 units).

The first two projects are currently being evaluated by the city’s Land Use boards. As proposed, the apartments will be offered to workers whose households earn approximately $36,000 to $80,000 annually.         

It is important to note these are not low-income households, nor are they related to the “Inclusionary Zoning” or “SPA Housing Ordinance” currently being debated, which if approved would site “affordable” workforce apartments in all new developments citywide.    

 

Code Blue Emergency Homeless Shelter Maintains Forward Track

An appeal filed by nearly two dozen residents in opposition to the building of a permanent Code Blue emergency homeless shelter on the city’s west side was rejected in a 7-0 vote by the city ZBA Monday night, in an overcrowded City Hall chamber attended by more than 70 people. 

The proposed 6,400 square foot facility is slated to be sited on Walworth Street adjacent to the Shelters of Saratoga – which offers case management services, service referrals and resources and other programs to individuals who are homeless or at-risk of homelessness, since 1991.  The project is believed to next be headed to the city Planning Board, which meets on July 13. 

 

Voters to Decide on a New Form of Governing Nov. 7

The Charter Review Commission passed a resolution by an 11-2 vote at the Saratoga Music Hall Tuesday night, approving the final version of a Charter and proposing an alternative form of government. 

Since its inception in 1915, the city has operated under a “commission” form of governing, comprised of four commissioners and one mayor each running separate departments and all having equal say. After 13 months of deliberation, the Commission concluded that a council-manager form of government would better serve the city. Voters will have their say at the polls on Nov. 7.

The proposal calls for a new City Council comprised of seven members, including the mayor, and the establishment of a professional City Manager to consolidate the city's administrative functions.  

Tuesday night, the Commission adopted a handful of amendments to its draft plan. Among them is the suggested compensation of the mayor - an annual salary of $40,000 plus health and medical insurance coverage under the city’s plan – and the six other council members, stipulated as $14,500 annually with the option to purchase into the city medical at their own expense. Compensation would not be extended beyond the elected terms of any of the seven council members – each of whom must reside in the city.  

"In our research, interviews and deliberations, we found that great benefit will come from consolidating the administration of city government under one professional manager, and giving the elected City Council powers of oversight, leadership, fiscal control and policy," said Commission Chairman Bob Turner.

The 15-member Saratoga Springs Charter Review Commission has been meeting since May 2016 and staged 35 full commission meetings, 40 subcommittee meetings, three town halls and public information sessions. The final version of the charter may be downloaded at:  saratogacharter.com.  A voter education campaign is underway and residents may schedule an educational session by emailing the organization at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

July Paving Schedule

The following city roads will be under construction in July, according to the department of public works:  Franklin Street - Washington Street to Division Street, mill Monday July 10 and pave Wednesday, July 12;  Division Street - Clinton Street to Beekman Street, mill Tuesday, July 11 and pave Thursday, July 13; Pearl Street – van Dorn Street to Seward Street, mill Tuesday, July 11 and pave Thursday, July 13; pave Cobb Alley – Beekman Street to So. Franklin Street  pave Wednesday, July 12.  

Published in News
Thursday, 29 June 2017 16:03

June 30th - July 6th

COURTS 

Patrick J. Toomey, 40, of South Glens Falls, was sentenced on June 22 to five days in jail and five years of probation, after pleading to felony DWI regarding an incident that occurred in Moreau. 

Frank C, Evans, 29, of Mechanicville, pleaded on June 22 to felony aggravated DWI, in connection with an incident that occurred in Malta. Sentencing is scheduled for Sept. 5. 

Zarak O. Ali, 44, of Albany, was sentenced on June 21 to 1 to 3 years in state prison, after pleading to offering a false instrument for filing in the first-degree, in connection with an incident that occurred in Ballston Spa. 

Barbara D. Delong, 35, of South Glens Falls, was sentenced on June 21 to pay a fine and restitution, after pleading to felony insurance fraud in connection with an incident that occurred in Moreau. 

Jackie R, Coffey, 29, of Ballston Spa, was sentenced on June `19 to six months in jail, after pleading to second degree vehicular assault, in connection with an incident that occurred in Saratoga Springs in July 2016. 

Jody C. Hanes, 36, of Malta, was sentenced on June 19 to 20 years in state prison, after being found guilty to the charges of first degree burglary, and fourth degree criminal possession of a weapon in connection with an incident that occurred in Malta. 

POLICE 

Sean A. Bennett, 33, of Albany, was charged on June 16 with second degree burglary, menacing, and four counts of endangering the welfare of a child. Bennett is accused of unlawfully entering a residence in the town of Milton and menacing another person with a large wooden object.   Four children were also present in the residence during the incident.  This was a domestic incident and there were no injuries involved, according to the Saratoga County Sheriff’s Office.   Bennett was sent to Saratoga County Jail without bail and will answer the respective charges in the Milton Town Court at a later date.   

Shane A. Gregory, 29, of Victory Mills, was charged on June 17 with felony criminal contempt and harassment, a violation.  Gregory is accused of headbutting, pushing, and tripping a female known to him in violation of an order of protection.  He was arraigned in the Milton Town Court and released on his own recognizance.  He is scheduled to appear in the Milton Town Court at a later date.

Joshua Y Delvalle-Hernandez, age 19, Saratoga Springs, was charged on June 20 with misdemeanor criminal mischief. 

Brian W. Martin, age 32, Clifton Park, was charged on June 20 with two misdemeanor counts petit larceny.

Margaret K. Knight, age 35, Saratoga Springs, was charged on June 20 with petit larceny, and welfare fraud – both misdemeanors. 

Michael A. Gartman, age 22, Rowesville, South Carolina, was charged on June 20 with three misdemeanor counts criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Nickolaus K. Davis, age 19, Orangeburg, South Carolina, was charged on June 20 with two misdemeanor counts criminal possession of a controlled substance, the felonies: criminal possession of a forged instrument and criminal possession of a weapon, and unlawful possession of marijuana. 

William P. Childers, age 34, Glens Falls, was charged on June 20 with speeding, aggravated unlicensed operation misdemeanor, and unlawful possession of marijuana. 

Joseph R. Bozony, age 22, Saratoga Springs, was charged on June 19 with failure to stop at a stop sign, and aggravated unlicensed operation third degree- a misdemeanor. 

James M. Caron-Williams, age 22, Saratoga Springs, was charged on June 19 with two felony counts criminal possession stolen property.

Jason M. McMahon, age 40, Saratoga Springs, was charged on June 18 with criminal trespass misdemeanor, and unlawful possession of marijuana. 

Vasco D. Hale, age 41, South Glens Falls, was charged on June 18 with aggravated unlicensed operation misdemeanor, and failed to signal a turn.

Owen G. Phinney, age 23, Gansevoort, was charged on June 18 with misdemeanor DWI, resisting arrest- a misdemeanor, and the felonies: aggravated unlicensed operation and assault in the second-degree.

Marquan T. Threatt, age 26, Albany, was charged on June 18 with registration plate display violation and misdemeanor aggravated unlicensed operation. 

Anthony J. Diorio, age 20, Saratoga Springs, was charged on June 18 with unlawful possession of marijuana and aggravated unlicensed operation – a misdemeanor.

Jennifer J. Slachtovsky, age 33, Amsterdam, was charged on June 17 with misdemeanor DWI, felony aggravated DWI – due to a 15-year-old being in the vehicle, misdemeanor operating a motor vehicle with suspended registration, and misdemeanor endangering the welfare of a child.

Jessica S. Devanney, age 28, Broadalbin, was charged on June 17 with misdemeanor DWI, and a driving violation. 

Nicholas C. Goulet, age 19, Ballston Spa, was charged on June 17 with misdemeanor DWI, and two driving violations. 

Published in Police Blotter
Page 55 of 66

Blotter

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