Thursday, 11 February 2021 15:15 Written by Emily Meagher

Walking around a farmers’ market, you see tables neatly displayed with mountains of produce. There is a long journey before produce lands on market tables and then, eventually, your table. Farmers are on a tight schedule to do all they can to make sure their crops flourish. Now that we are deep into winter, we asked local farmers how they are preparing for this year’s growing season.

Laurie Kokinda, owner of Kokinda Farm, says, “It’s the hardest time of year, in terms of grunt work.” Farms are working tirelessly to sanitize their greenhouses and tunnels and repair and order new equipment. Farms are starting their first seedings like tomatoes, alliums, and head lettuce. This year, many farmers ordered their seed supply earlier than usual due to Coronavirus-related increases in demand as well as mail delays. Paul and Sandy Arnold, owners of Pleasant Valley Farm, note, “Normally, we can get seeds in the day after we order. This year, we’re waiting weeks!”

Local farms often choose to work together to share resources. Pleasant Valley Farm’s Sustainable Farmers’ Network Group is hard at work in the mid-winter, bulk-ordering supplies so that farms may share discounts. Gomez Veggie Ville works with Denison Farm to get this year’s supply of organic potato seeds. And, for the first time, they will work to grow ginger. “I am learning how to grow ginger well in our climate. Hopefully, if it works out, we’ll be able to bring some to the market in September,” says Efrain Gomez.

Owl Wood Farm is taking this year’s seed shortages as an opportunity to try a new practice: seed saving. “We’ve wanted to save seeds that aren’t offered commercially, like tomato heirloom varieties and Abenaki flint corn, for a while. It involves a lot of work and isn’t very economical; you have to dedicate a new plot of land and grasp a whole new knowledge base,” says Mark Bascom. “But we see that seed saving is important this year especially.”

Squash Villa Farm (formerly Squashville) is trying not just a new crop or practice but also a whole new land plot after moving farms in 2020. “There’s lots of anticipation! As soon as the snow melts, I’m eager to walk the new land and just get a feel for what it’s like to step into the soil,” says Gupta-Carlson.

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is open Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Find us online at saratogafarmersmarket.org and follow us on Facebook and Instagram. For online pre-ordering and curbside pickup, visit localline.ca/saratoga-farmers-market.

FM BeansGreens

Read 122 times Last modified on Thursday, 11 February 2021 15:19

Blotter

  • COURT Edward Kelly, 48, of Glens Falls, was sentenced April 2 to 6 months jail, after pleading to possessing a sexual performance by a child.  Cameron S. Vandusen, 27, of Galway, pleaded March 30 to felony robbery in connection with an incident that occurred in Greenfield. Sentencing scheduled June 11.  Samantha E. Germain, 27, of Greenfield, pleaded April 1 to criminal contempt in the first-degree. Sentencing June 3.  Crystal M. Hebert, 34, of Saratoga Springs, pleaded April 1 to grand larceny in the third-degree, in connection with an incident in Saratoga Springs. Sentencing June 3.  Jack Jeffers, 25, of Vorheesville,…

Property Transactions

  • BALLSTON Catherien Bixler sold property at 12 Lawmar Lane to Lara Scheeren for $210,000. Thomas Raux sold property at 143 Lakehill Rd to D & L Enterprises LLC for $130,000. Barbera Homes Kelley Farms  LLC sold property at 21 Stablegate Dr to Pierre Castonguay for $453,602. CORINTH Mark Knapp sold property at 20 Morgans Way to Everette O’Neill for $365,000 GREENFIELD Jason Cadoret sold property at 27 Rebecca Dr to Salvatore Cautela for $572,500. Warren Vicha sold property at 129 Daniels Rd to Jeffrey Marlett for $175,000 MALTA MKJ Ventures LLC sold property at 287 Plains Rd to DeGraff Bloom…
  • NYPA
  • Saratoga County Chamber
  • BBB Accredited Business
  • Saratoga Convention & Tourism Bureau
  • Saratoga Springs Downtown Business Association