Displaying items by tag: Saratoga Farmers' Market

Thursday, 07 May 2020 13:57

Need Hand Sanitizer? Find it at the Market!

Makers of locally crafted whiskey, gin, and vodka have been a part of the Saratoga Farmers’ Market for several years. 

Local distilleries such as Springbrook Hollow Farm and Yankee Distillers have shared with their customers spirits made from New York grown grains that have been slowly cooked down, fermented, distilled, and aged. The process was all about care. 

Care took on a different meaning when the COVID-19 pandemic erupted two months ago. Hand sanitizer and other cleaning supplies essential to protecting one’s self suddenly became hard to find. Many worried about coming into contact with the virus and not being able to get clean. The distilleries had a solution. Now, bottles of hand sanitizer share space on their farmers’ market tables with the spirits for which they are known.

“We realized that as cleaning supplies started to come into short supply some of the raw alcohol we had on-site could be used to clean things around the distillery,” says Steve Hamilton of Yankee Distillers. “And then when the New York Liquor Authority and the World Health Organization started to publish guidelines for distilleries to transition their production over to hand sanitizer, we realized that we were positioned to provide a product that our community needs right now.”

“We had all the equipment, everything we needed,” adds Tara Amazon of Springbrook Hollow. “We knew we needed to help keep our community safe in whatever way that we could.”

Yankee Distillers makes its sanitizer with alcohol, a bittering agent that denatures it, glycerin to soften it, peroxide, and water. They follow a World Health Organization formula. It is being sold in half-gallon containers for $32 and 4-ounce spray-top bottles for $5. The company also is offering face masks imprinted with its logo.

Springbrook’s product is made from grain alcohol, glycerin, and peroxide. It is being sold for $45 a gallon, or $35 a gallon for four or more gallons. Two-ounce spray-top bottles cost $3.

Springbrook just donated 5,000 bottles to health care workers in Saratoga, Glens Falls, and Queensbury north to the Canadian border.

Market staff and some vendors also are keeping bottles of their sanitizer on their tables and at cleaning points throughout the market as part of their effort to keep the environment safe.

The Saratoga Farmers Market is 3-6 p.m. Wednesdays and 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays outside at the Wilton Mall. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

FM PickledRamps

Published in Food

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is kicking off its summer season this weekend with many changes, as the region continues to adapt to the Coronavirus pandemic.

The market hours will shift to 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays and 3 to 6 p.m. Wednesdays. The market also will not be returning to High Rock Park this summer. It will continue to operate outdoors at the Wilton Mall. 

High Rock Park is not available this year because of ongoing construction and potential road closures. In addition, social distancing protocols would not be able to be maintained in and around the market pavilions.

“The mall’s management has been extremely supportive of us,” says Saratoga Farmers’ Market Board president Beth Trattel. “Their flexibility has helped us keep the market going.”

The market had been operating in the mall’s food court area before the pandemic. It closed for one week in mid-March, and then reopened outdoors in the parking area between the former Bon Ton and B.J.’s Wholesale Club six weeks ahead of schedule.

The market has been following strict social distancing requirements. Vendors are spaced several feet apart and keep gloves, disinfectant wipes, and hand sanitizer on their tables. Face coverings must be worn. Customers are asked to remain six feet apart from vendors and each other, not handle produce, and to leave their dogs at home. No music or other entertainment will be offered at this time. Only food and hand sanitizer produced by local distilleries has been available for purchase.

These restrictions are expected to remain in place through the summer, says market administrator Emily Meagher. Meagher anticipates 65 vendors will participate in the Saturday market at the season’s peak, and 20 on Wednesdays. The market also has established a drive-up curbside service for pickups of preordered items.

Meagher adds that while the pandemic conditions have made the market less sociable than it usually is, vendors are receiving a lot of customer love.

“Our aim is to continue to provide our community with fresh and safe local food,” Meagher says. “We are less festive, but with farmers markets deemed an essential service in New York, we are celebrated now more than ever.”

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market summer season begins Saturday, May 2 at the market’s current location at the Wilton Mall. The market is 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays and 3-6 p.m. Wednesdays. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

WEDNESDAY MARKET VENDORS:

  • 518 Farms
  • Burger Farm
  • Euro Delicacies
  • Gifford Farms
  • Gomez Veggie Ville
  • Goode Farm
  • Green Jeans Market Farm
  • Left Field Shaved Ice
  • Mister Edge Sharpening
  • Old World Farm
  • Owl Wood Farm
  • Peace Love Jerky Treats
  • Pura Vida Fisheries
  • Ramble Creek Farm
  • Saratoga Garlic Company
  • Scotch Ridge Berry Farm
  • Squashville Farm
  • The Food Florist
  • Underwoods/Shushan Valley Hydro Farms

SATURDAY MARKET VENDORS:

  • Argyle Cheese Farmer
  • Balet Flowers & Design
  • Ballston Lake Apiaries
  • Battenkill Valley Creamery 
  • Burger Farm 
  • Clark Dahlia Gardens & Greenhouses 
  • Collar City Cold Pressed Juice
  • Daily Fresh
  • Dancing Ewe Farm
  • Earth to Mind
  • Elihu Farm
  • Euro Delicacies 
  • Feathered Antler
  • Freddy’s Rockin’ Hummus 
  • Giovanni Fresco
  • Gomez Veggie Ville
  • Goode Farm 
  • Grandma Apple’s Cheesecakes, LLC 
  • Green Jeans Market Farm 
  • Halls Pond Farm
  • Healthy Gourmet Kitchen 
  • Junbucha
  • Kokinda Farm 
  • Lewis Waite Farm 
  • Humiston’s Vegetables
  • Junbucha
  • Kim Dolan Designed Jewelry
  • Kokinda Farm
  • Left Field Shaved Ice
  • Lewis Waite Farm
  • Longlesson Farm 
  • Lot 32 Flower Farm 
  • Mariaville Mushroom Men 
  • Momma’s Secret Salad Dressings
  • Moon Cycle Seed Company 
  • Moxie Ridge Farm 
  • Mrs. London’s
  • Muddy Trail Jerky Co. 
  • Mugzy’s Barkery
  • Nettle Meadow
  • Nut Zez, LLC
  • Old World Farm
  • Owl Wood Farm
  • Petra Pocket Pies 
  • Pleasant Valley Farm 
  • Puckers Gourmet 
  • R&G Cheese Makers
  • Ramble Creek Farm 
  • Saratoga Chocolate Co. 
  • Saratoga Garlic Company
  • Saratoga Peanut Butter Co.
  • Saratoga Spicery 
  • Saratoga Suds ‘n’ Stuff 
  • Scotch Ridge Berry Farm 
  • Slate River Farms 
  • Slate Valley Farms
  • Slate Valley Farms
  • Slyboro Cider House
  • Something’s Brewing
  • Springbrook Hollow Farm Distillery 
  • Squashville Farm 
  • The Chocolate Spoon 
  • The Donut Shop
  • The Food Florist
  • The Smoothie Shoppe 
  • Vermont Spatzle Company
  • Three Little Birds Concessions
  • Underwoods/Shushan Valley Hydro Farms
  • Viviana Puello Jewelry
  • Zoe Burghard Ceramics
Published in Food
Thursday, 23 April 2020 13:06

Quarantine Cooking with Kids

With schools closed and many of us working from home, parents are desperately looking for ways to keep their children occupied. Food provides many opportunities for learning and play as well as nourishing our bodies and teaching important life skills. 

Here are 5 simple ways to use food and our local food system as learning tools for young children: 

1. Cooking and Baking 
Cooking and baking offer many learning opportunities for children; organizational skills, counting, measuring ingredients, team work, even writing out a grocery list. Cooking can be as simple as a smoothie, a salad, no-bake cookies, or assembling a picnic. Offering choices and presenting the activity as a game can be helpful in keeping the attention of your little ones. 

2. Crafts and Games
The internet is peppered with DIY crafts and games to keep kids entertained, but look no farther than your fridge for real fun. Making fruit and vegetable prints with discarded stalks, cores, and stems is a creative, no-waste activity for little ones. Building constructions or creating a piece of art from cut fruit and vegetable pieces can make a tasty snack much more entertaining.   

3. Planting Activities
If you want to garden with your kids but you’re not quite ready to dig out a space in your yard, here are some ideas that provide opportunities to grow on a small scale. Herbs, leafy vegetables, and celery may simply grow in water by cutting the plant at its base and placing it in water. An indoor herb garden or an outdoor container garden offers the full gardening experience. If you don’t have time to plant seeds, contact your local nursery as many are offering curbside pickup for plants.

4. STEM Activities
Whether your child is learning about taste vs. smell or the phases of the moon, food can be used for countless STEM experiments to stimulate higher thinking and problem solving. Try shaking heavy cream to make butter, experiment with the many ways to bake a potato, or make icecream with salt, ice, and cream. 

5. Driving Farm Tour or Virtual Tour
For families itching to get out of the house, a short drive through farm country can lift spirits during this difficult time. Make a map of your local producers, roll down the car windows, and take in the beauty that the area has to offer. Nettle Meadow and the Kemp Sanctuary even offer a virtual tour of their farm with opportunities to meet their famous rescue animals.

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturdays outside the Wilton Mall. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and check our newsletter for updates.

FM SuperheroMuffins

Published in Food

Spring often challenges farmers. As the land springs back to life from winter dormancy, work intensifies. Animals are born; seedlings start to pop up from the soil. Farmers nurture these new fragile beings against gusting winds, chilling rains, momentary patches of sun, sometimes snow.

This year has brought an additional challenge: the COVID-19 outbreak.

Mark Bascom and Lindsay Fisk, of Owl Wood Farm, returned to the Saratoga Farmers’ Market last Saturday, a few weeks ahead of schedule. This was due to an early spring rebound in some overwintered spinach and kale, along with the arrival of two summer interns a month early.

“They were supposed to start on May 1, but they were coming from Kentucky and were worried about state borders closing to keep the virus from spreading,” says Fisk.

Fisk and Bascom had not quite finished work on a house they were building for themselves and were living in the mobile home the interns were to occupy. The interns were willing to live in their van.

“But that would be uncomfortable,” Bascom says, “so we doubled down and pushed twice as hard to get into our home sooner than planned.”

The early arrival turned out to be a blessing. Fisk and Bascom had been trying to work out protocols for social distancing between workers and themselves, and with the interns already on site, some of that concern was eased. 

Pleasant Valley Farm’s Paul and Sandy Arnold began their winter with a world cruise, which COVID-19 cut short. They arrived home a few weeks ago and self-quarantined to ensure they were virus-free.

But quarantine didn’t mean lying low; the couple’s children, who had been running the farm, invited them to get to work! “We chopped wood, tilled the fields, planted many different vegetable crops, helped organize the computer orders, and did what we could to help with other farm work,” says Sandy Arnold. “We just worked on remote areas of the farm, not production, and did not attend the markets until now.”

Farmers, of course, are not immune to the virus itself. But they are accustomed to working alone and outside. This has helped many farmers gained a new appreciation for what they have and do, as a recent Facebook reflection from Mariaville Mushroom Men’s Bobby Chandler illustrates: 

“When I was a kid, I used to sometimes regret the fact that my Rotterdam parents decided to move to a farm when I was three. It wasn’t that I didn’t love all the land and it wasn’t that I didn’t love the animals. It was purely due to being called a ‘smelly, dumb farmer’ by the other kids. I never understood why I was being put down for this.”

Now, Chandler continued, “This is what I have come to realize: “There is a pandemic wreaking havoc on this country. Many people are out of work and are stuck at home with the children bored out of their minds. While most people are dealing with that, I am here in Mariaville, with my three kids playing outside. We are still producing food while many cannot source the simplest of products. We are farmers, we never stop working. The world needs us now more than ever.”

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturdays outside the Wilton Mall. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and check our newsletter for updates.

Published in Food

These days leading up to Easter have presented many unprecedented challenges. As a community, we’ve grappled with job losses, pay cuts, shortages of basic goods, fears of the spreading Coronavirus, and in some cases, illness itself.

Farmers, too, face such challenges. Yet, as histories of droughts, hurricanes, floods, crop failures, and climate change show, farmers can adapt innovatively to crises. Many who bring their goods weekly to the Saratoga Farmers’ Market are creating others ways to connect with customers and make their products available in a safe, wholesome manner.

“It is vital that we keep the farmers market running during this time of crisis,” says market manager Emily Meagher. “Because of that, we want to make sure we offer the community as many options as possible to obtain fresh, local food.” 

Most of the Saratoga Farmers’ Market vendors are continuing to bring their products to market each Saturday from 9:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Tomorrow’s market will feature many of the fresh, healing foods of Easter. Look, for instance, for freshly cut lettuce, spinach, and other greens from Pleasant Valley and Green Jeans, lamb from Elihu, duck and goose eggs from Squashville, and maple treats from Slate Valley farms, among others. 

Vendors who are not attending the market are inviting shoppers to contact them directly to preorder such items as Mangiamo’s pasta and Lewis Waite meats. Other vendors are offering delivery and/or curbside pickup services at other locations or suggest looking for their items in local specialty stores. A spreadsheet on the farmers’ market website at www.saratogafarmersmarket.org lists the various options available.

The market is following the social distance protocols established by the state’s federation of farmers’ markets. Vendors are spaced several feet apart and have sanitizers, disinfectant wipes, and gloves at their tables. The market is asking shoppers to not crowd around vendor tables and has established a curbside pickup service for preordered items near the mall entrance. Look for the red tent.

“We want our market to be a safe space,” Meagher says. “We might not be able to gather socially as we normally do, but we can still offer our community fresh and wholesome foods from our local farms.” 

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturdays in the parking lot outside the Wilton Mall. Please follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for updates. 

 

FM LambChops

Published in Food

Our responsibility, by direction, is to stay at home and only head out for essentials when absolutely necessary. As we settle in safely for the weeks to come, many are looking to foods that store well, foods that are easy to prepare, and, most importantly, foods that are available right now.   

While food bloggers hail smart and savvy ‘pantry meals’ that utilize canned goods, rice, and beans, the farmers’ market offers an expanded palette of foods that are easy to store and last longer than most produce found at grocery stores. 

Vegetables like onions, garlic, potatoes, and carrots are often at the core of savory, hearty meals. They are durable and have a good shelf life, and these vegetables work well in diverse meals depending on preparation methods and seasonings. Please note that garlic is currently unavailable at market. 

Milk, butter, cheese, and eggs are staples that most of us keep in constant rotation in the refrigerator. These binding ingredients are often what pulls the meal together. Milk may be used to create a creamy finish to soups and sauces like a classic roux - which is made from butter, flour, and milk. Eggs can be used to create satisfying omelettes and frittatas with endless possibilities for fillings. Cheese is essential for homemade pizza, quesadillas, baked ziti, and numerous other dishes. 

Shelf-stable vegetables like sweet potatoes, beets, and turnips can last for several weeks when kept in a cool, dry place. These vegetables can be the main stars of any meal, soup, or salad, and they are high in nutritional value. Even fruits like apples can keep for 2-3 weeks. Having a variety of these long-lasting fruits and vegetables inspires cooking that’s creative, comforting, and simple.

Meat and poultry are necessities for most, and they can be bought directly from farmers. Ground beef, whole chickens, and steaks and roasts can be kept frozen and thawed under refrigeration once you are ready to prepare them. Leftovers from a large roast or a whole roasted chicken may be used in a variety of dishes and soups as well.

While shopping at the farmers’ market, please remember to follow universal precautions to slow the spread of COVID-19. Please try to send one member of the household to shop and give 6’ space while shopping. Only touch products that you commit to buy and be sure to wash your hands thoroughly before and after shopping.

If you plan to shop for something specific, please check our website and social media pages for updates. These are changeable times and we are working to keep you up to date with vendor and product availability each week.

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at the Wilton Mall. Follow our updates on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and in our weekly e-newsletter.

FM PantryPotPie

Published in Food
Thursday, 26 March 2020 12:50

Farmers' Markets Still Essential to Community

Community life in and around Saratoga has shut down in the effort to slow the Coronavirus spread. One space that remains open is the Saratoga Farmers’ Market on Saturday mornings at the Wilton Mall.

The market, deemed an essential service, set up outdoors last Saturday in the parking lot outside the shuttered mall. Market staff created “stalls” out of parking spaces and placed vendors in spots that were spaced to maintain a safe distance.

Vendors set up tables and in some cases tents. They donned rubber gloves and had disinfectant wipes and sanitizer on hand.

What makes farms and farmers’ markets essential?

Most crucially perhaps is the fact that they offer food that is locally grown. You can find fresh vegetables, eggs, and chicken at the Saratoga Farmers’ Market, along with such storable vegetables like carrots and potatoes; beef, pork, lamb, and goat; and even shelf-stable sauces, pickles, and dried beans.

“We need to be able to get our food to the community,” said Jason Heitman, of Green Jeans Market Farm, a vegetable grower.

“Farms are the heart of community,” added Julie Noble, of Ramble Creek Farm, which offers mushrooms and meats. “It’s important to keep food local, especially at this time.”

Farmers’ markets rarely operate outdoors before May. Last Saturday was sunny but windy, with temperatures that were below freezing. As a vendor myself, I shivered through three layers of jackets, wool socks, and gloves. I filled my table with eggs and set out coolers of meat. I was unsure what to expect, but as market regulars and new customers arrived, it quickly became apparent that many hungered not only for food but a sense of community, too. 

Amid sales, vendors and customers exchanged news. There were no handshakes or hugs, but plenty of laughs and well wishes.

“We’ll be continuing the market every week,” said Beth Trattel, market board president and owner of Something’s Brewing “We’re working with the mall to ensure that the space that we’re in remains safe.” 

Kelley Hillis of Puckers Gourmet Pickles could not offer samples of her pickles but did display their award-winning ribbons on her coat.

“Farmers markets are vital,” she said. “The money spent here supports a local producer. It helps keep my family, and other farm families fed.”

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at the Wilton Mall. Follow our updates on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and in our weekly e-newsletter. 

FM RoastChicken

Published in Food
Thursday, 19 March 2020 13:19

Enjoying The Saratoga Farmers’ Market Safely

Efforts to slow the Coronavirus spread prompted us to cancel last week’s Saratoga Farmers’ Market. We are optimistic the market will take place this Saturday at the Wilton Mall and will post any updates on our Facebook page and other social media. .

We value our shoppers, farmers, and the communities we serve. Your health is important to us. Current health guidelines indicate that foods available at producer-only farmers markets such as ours are likely to be safer than goods obtained from groceries or delivery services because the distance that the food travels is shorter and the number of persons handling it is less. Purchases at our market also support local businesses.

We are working with mall management to expand the market’s space. If weather permits, more vendors may set up outdoors. We also are encouraging vendors to keep hand sanitizer and anti-bacterial wipes at their tables and to wear gloves or use some other means of keeping their hands out of direct contact with raw foods. All prepared foods will be prepackaged, and we have put the offers of samples on hold.

Here’s how you can help us keep our market healthy, too: 
Wash your hands if you eat just before shopping.
Try not to congregate too tightly around vendor tables.
Allow our vendors to hand produce, meats, eggs, cheeses, and other food items to you. Try not to touch baskets of carrots, bags of lettuce, cabbage heads or other such items yourself.
Be patient, as vendors clean their hands in between handling produce and money. Some vendors might have different people delegated to taking care of these tasks.
If you are not feeling well, do not enter the market directly. Contact our vendors in advance, or the market manager. We can arrange for a curbside pickup, and in some cases, a delivery. 

Last week, Pleasant Valley Farm drew on its extensive mailing list to survey customers and based on the nearly 70 responses, set up a drop point for preorders as well as a home delivery service. As Pleasant Valley’s Robert Arnold said, the goal “is to provide fresh, healthy produce to all of our faithful customers in the region any way we can.” We look forward to seeing you soon. 

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturdays at the Wilton Mall. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for updates.

Many of these businesses are offering pickup and delivery options. See below for the Saratoga Farmer’s Market Vendors' Contact Information:

FROM THE FARM

Argyle Cheese Factory (Cheese, yogurt)
518-638-8966, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Battenkill Valley Creamery (Milk)
518-854-9400, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Elihu Farm (Lamb, eggs)
518-753-7838, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Gomez Veggie Ville (Vegetables, fruits)
518-686-5212, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Green Jeans Market Farm (Vegetables)
518-232-1968, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Kokinda Farm (Vegetables, jams, bread)
518-763-7856, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Lewis Waite Farm (Beef, pork)
518-692-3120, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Longlesson Farm (Beef, chicken, pork)
518-753-2163, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mariaville Mushroom Men (Mushrooms, meats)
518-810-6061, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Moxie Ridge Farm (Cheese, yogurt, meats)
518-620-6464, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Pleasant Valley Farm (Vegetables, fruits)
518-638-6501, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Ramble Creek Farm (Mushrooms, meats)
518-769-0897, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

R&G Cheesemakers (Cheese, yogurt)
518-892-6701, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Saratoga Apple (Apple products)
518-695-3131, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Slate River Farms (Beef, chicken, eggs)
518-258-3858, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Squashville Farm (Meats, eggs, vegetables)
518-650-5881, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Underwood’s Greenhouse/Shushan Valley Hydro Farm
(Hydroponic vegetables)
518-854-9564, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

ARTISAN ITEMS

Ballston Lake Apiaries (Honey, pollen, candles)
518-384-2539, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Earth to Mind (CBD products)
518-353-1150, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Feathered Antler (Art, clothing)
518-290-7461, featheredantler.com

Freddy’s Rockin’ Hummus (Hummus)
518-727-6966, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Grandma Apple’s Cheesecakes (Cheesecakes)
518-368-6091, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Healthy Gourmet Kitchen
(Soup/stew mixes, dips, seasonings)
518-527-1472, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

High Peaks Distilling (Spirits)
518-512-6098, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Junbucha (Kombucha drinks)
518-353-1150, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mangiamo (Pasta)
518-450-4006, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Moon Cycle Seed Company (Seed blends)
315-323-3153, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Muddy Trail Jerky (Beef jerky, dips, seasonings)
518-642-2194, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mugzy’s Barkery (Dog treats)
518-573-0400, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Puckers Gourmet (Fermented and pickled foods)
518-854-3301, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Saratoga Chocolate Co. (Chocolate)
518-222-5366, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Saratoga Garlic Company (Garlic products)
518-581-4093, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Saratoga Peanut Butter Co. (Peanut butter)
888-967-3268, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Slate Valley Farms (Maple syrup, honey)
518-642-3265, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Something’s Brewing (Coffee, teas, lemonades)
518-531-4197, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Springbrook Hollow Farm Distillery (Spirits)
518-338-3130, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The Vermont Spatzle Company (Spatzle noodles)
802-265-1234, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Vital Eats (Vegan prepared foods, sauces, spices)
518-281-9461, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Yankee Distillers (Spirits)
518-406-3245, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

READY-TO-EAT & BAKED GOODS

Daily Fresh (Indian food)
518-698-6264, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Euro Delicacies (Meditteranean food)
518-210-5436, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Giovanni Fresco (Italian food)
518-949-1913, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Mrs. London’s (Baked goods)
518-581-8100, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

My Dacha Slovenian Cafe (Eastern European food)
518-272-3505, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Petra Pocket Pies (Mediterranean food)
518-744-9310, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The Chocolate Spoon (Baked goods)
518-580-9577, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The Food Florist (Frozen prepared meals, pies)
518-545-0623, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Published in Food

Upon the first look, the farmers’ market can be overwhelming. Tables are piled high with produce, coolers are full of meat and cheeses, and display cases tower high with bottles of syrup and jars of jam. In addition, products available at the farmers’ market change slightly each season. Here’s a peek at 10 things you might not know are sold at the Saratoga Farmers’ Market.

SHAVING SOAP
“Soft Serve” shaving cream is an old-fashioned wet shaving soap made from goat milk and pig lard. This nourishing specialty soap is made exclusively at Moxie Ridge Farm. Just add some water, lather with a shaving brush, and enjoy the lather for a smooth shave.

MUSHROOM COFFEE & TEAS
Mariaville Mushroom Men have made it easy to enjoy a daily serving of mushrooms with their perfectly blended mushroom teas that come in easy to use teabags. Looking for something a little more robust? Scoop, stir and enjoy their instant mushroom coffee. 

SPÄTZLE (GLUTEN-FREE)
The Vermont Spätzle Company has traditional spätzle that is no-boil, ready in 5 minutes, and gluten-free. What’s even better is that this spätzle is as versatile as it is tasty. The Vermont Spätzle Company has dozens of quick and easy spätzle recipes on their website.

GOAT
Goat has a distinct flavor that is leaner than lamb and can be prepared in a variety of ways, such as being stewed, curried, baked, grilled, barbecued, minced, canned, fried, or made into sausage. Find a variety of cuts, ribs, and roasts at Squashville Farm.

DOG TREATS
Dog treats are serious business at the farmers’ market. Longlesson Farm and Lewis Waite Farm both offer beef bones specifically for dogs. Something’s Brewing makes ‘beastly bites’ dog biscuits from all-natural ingredients. And, Mugzy’s Barkery has a whole line of treats and cakes made from all-natural and organic ingredients.

CBD OIL
With high-quality hemp grown and processed here in New York, Earth to Mind CBD products are designed to help relieve stress, soothe pain, and attain a sense of well being when added to your holistic routine. If you’re looking for an alternative form of healing, visit Earth to Mind about adding CBD oil to your holistic routine.

TAKE-HOME MEALS
The Food Florist offers a variety of frozen take-home meals made with carefully sourced ingredients so you won’t have to compromise over convenience. The Food Florist offers a variety of casseroles and lasagnas to choose from, even breakfast and gluten-free options.   

HORMONE BALANCING SEED BLENDS
Seed cycling is an easy and functional way to get nutrients in the body to help women rebalance their hormones. Moon Cycle Seed Company blends four seeds: pumpkin, flax, sunflower, and sesame. When ingested in a specific combination daily, they provide the body with essential nutrients.

SHOOTS
Whether you eat them by the handful, put them on a salad or sauté them with garlic, pea and radish shoots offer a burst of nutritious and delicious flavor. Varieties of shoots are growing in the greenhouse at Pleasant Valley Farm and Green Jeans Market Farm. 

BEEF JERKY
Muddy Trail Jerky offers handcrafted beef jerky in 13 flavors. Sweet, savory, or spicy options include Bourbon Barbecue, Habanero Mango, Bacon & Molasses just for starters. Visit their stand for over 50 varieties of dips, rubs, seasonings, and meal starters. Is beef not your thing? Try Zen Jerky by Vital Eats. This flavorful, plant-based jerky is packed with protein. 

The Saratoga Farmers Market is 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturdays in the food court of the Wilton Mall. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for previews of what’s fresh. 

Published in Food

Bill Higgins began growing garlic in 1998 on farmland in Northumberland, a community between Schuylerville and Saratoga. He sold the garlic to a food distributor at the Chelsea Market in Manhattan, and over time, began consulting with chefs to create a line of prepared products. 

Over the years, his enterprise Saratoga Garlic Co. expanded, supplying grocery stores, restaurants, and wholesalers with sauces and pickled products.

The business kept growing, and then last fall Higgins went small. He applied to become a new vendor with the Saratoga Farmers’ Market, joining the market’s cadre of local farmers, home producers, and artisans.

Now, Higgins spends Saturday mornings at the market’s winter location in the Wilton Mall, offering samples of their garlic products, greeting new customers, and reconnecting with friends.

Their experience is helping them understand better what their customers like. It also captures the community feeling that the Saratoga Farmers’ Market creates.

“We wanted a more direct connection and additional insight to what our end consumer is looking for,” says Max Higgins, who coordinates sales for Saratoga Garlic and is Bill Higgins’s son.

So far, the experience has been great. “Everyone at the market has been very welcoming and we’ve really enjoyed the positive atmosphere each Saturday,” Max Higgins says.

On top of that, they have discovered that old friends from elementary and high school days are market regulars, as well. And, says Max Higgins, “the live music is great.”

Saratoga Garlic Co.’s signature product is aioli, a garlic sauce with a mayonnaise base. The company offers five varieties, along with a pickled garlic product. The sauces can be used to season dishes, as a spread on crackers or bread, or as a condiment to such things as steaks, pork or goat, chops, or fish. 

Bill Higgins worked with a number of chefs to perfect his recipes over the years. He and his family still grow their own garlic, which is German white, a porcelain variety known for big bulbs, a robust flavor, and high tolerance to his sandy soil. The family also occasionally grows dill for their pickled products and has discussed the prospect of trying out such items as saffron, which flavors one of their aioli sauces.

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Wilton Mall. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

FM BLTBurritos

Published in Food
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