Displaying items by tag: Skidmore College

SARATOGA SPRINGS/MEXICO — In 2008, 14 year-old Eleuterio Martinez Ramirez, or Ele, arrived in the U.S. Speaking no English, he set off on a journey that would see him master the language, gain scholarships, a college degree, and working on a project to change the future of recycling. The reason for his journey? To search for a better future. 

Hailing from the small village of La Sabana, Copala in Oaxaca, Mexico, Ramirez came to Saratoga Springs and was assigned a guardian to help his adjustment to the U.S. Through a program put on at the backstretch, he learned English, and began to pursue higher education.

Ramirez attended Skidmore College, and studied Documentary Studies, Anthropology, and Math, with the goal of becoming an engineer. “To me, art and science are not separated, but related by how they help us understand and solve important problems in society,” he said.

While at Skidmore, Ramirez was able to travel back to his home village as part of an internship program. He was able to assist at a local school, Centro de Integracion Social 28, and began a community based photography program to help students learn about photography, and to explore his own Triqui culture. “The Triqui people are one of the pre-Colombian indigenous groups that live in the south-western of the state of Oaxaca, Mexico, who are still preserving their culture through their native language (called Triqui), beliefs and art,” explained Ramirez.

This internship became a photo project that was then put on exhibition at the Skidmore Case Center. The project, entitled, “Ventana a mi Comunidad (Window to my Community)” ran in the fall of 2018, and featured photos of local school children, landscapes, adults and daily routines of villagers.

After graduating from Skidmore in May of 2018, Ramirez was able to visit his hometown again with help from the Anne Palamountain Award. This time, he was able to continue his efforts in teaching local school children, and brought 15 tablets and other materials to help assist them.

Despite all of this, Ramirez has no plans of slowing down: he currently works as an Associate Technician at Global Foundries, and has big plans for the future. “My goal for this year while working at Global Foundries is to pursue a second bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering through a program at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute,” he said. 

Ramirez is also currently working on a recycling and solar project. “This project got my attention because I noticed that many rural areas in my home-state, especially in my community, don’t have recycling companies that take our plastic, so instead people just dump it out in the rivers or burn it, and this is very bad for the environment,” he explained. “I visualized that bringing this project

back home can have a positive impact on not just the community, but to the environment as well.”

Ramirez said that installed solar panels could help power schools and clinics in his home community. “This is essential to me because many teenagers, like me or under 18 year-olds, quit school because of the lack of resources that the school and/or the government don’t provide every year,” he said. “Therefore, I want to set up the goal to work on these projects and not just give back to my community, but inspire the young Triqui generation [to see] that everything can be done through the knowledge that they can gain through education, and to truly appreciate it because any ideas can be achieved by knowledge, and also determination and sacrifice.”

Throughout his journey, Ramirez has a large group of supporters throughout the community, ranging from professors, coworkers, and friends. “Few individuals have manifested their fear and used it to propel themselves forward down a virtuous path,” said Ramirez’s former professor, Bernardo Ramirez Rios. “Eleuterio Martinez Ramirez is one of the few individuals I know who has overcome tremendous adversity and will continue to shape the story of the United States of America in a righteous way.”

Another friend and supporter, Michelle Paquette-Deuel, Director of the Pre-College Program at Skidmore, has known Ramirez for 10 years. “When once asked why he [Ramirez] studied tirelessly as a Skidmore student, he explained that he carried on his shoulders the hopes of all those who had helped him to get there, that he couldn’t let them or himself down,” stated Paquette-Deuel. “His achievements reflect his steadfast work ethic and sacrifice on behalf of others and the future of his dreams—a future that now includes his U.S. citizenship. Eleuterio’s story entails an epic journey, but it is the measure of his character that is most remarkable.”

Ramirez’s large group of supporters was able to help him celebrate a momentous occasion, when he officially became an American. “I recently obtained my citizenship yesterday [Jan.17], which was the most remarkable day of my life because to me it represents not just a great accomplishment that I did, but it also represents all the people that have supported me through this long journey,” said Ramirez. 

Ramirez will continue to give back to his hometown, and to his new community in the U.S. “I witnessed many conditions that pushed me to leave when I was younger like poverty and lack of resources to enhance students’ learning,” he said. “I felt privileged to have all the opportunities that I gained through my education and just to be here in the USA, but I wanted to give back these opportunities to other students that don’t have it.”

Published in News

SARATOGA SPRINGS —For the 14th consecutive year, the Skidmore College community has come together to assist local residents and families through the Skidmore Cares community service program. 

This year, Skidmore faculty, staff and families raised more than $14,000, and donated more than 6,000 food items and nearly 1,000 school supplies and personal care items — setting Skidmore Cares fundraising and food collection records — for Saratoga County community organizations.

Founded in 2006 by Skidmore President Philip A. Glotzbach and his wife, Marie Glotzbach, the program has gathered more than $122,000 in monetary gifts and 45,000 food items, school supplies and personal care items over the years.

“Skidmore Cares is a moment when we pause each year and strengthen our College community as we also give back to the broader community of which we are part,” President Glotzbach said. “I am once again impressed by the kindness of colleagues and friends at Skidmore, who are helping community organizations meet the needs of individuals and families in Saratoga County during this holiday season.”

On Friday, Dec. 6, the Skidmore Cares sleigh on the lawn of Scribner House, the president’s home on North Broadway, overflowed with donated goods for neighbors in need. A blanket of snow set the scene as members of the Skidmore community and their families gathered for a festive open house in celebration of the season of giving.

Following the gathering, Skidmore student-athletes and employees delivered the donations to 10 local community service agencies: Corinth Central School District, Franklin Community Center, Latino Community Advocacy Program, Mary’s Haven, Salvation Army, Saratoga Center for the Family, Saratoga County Economic Opportunity Council, Saratoga Springs City School District PATHS program, Shelters of Saratoga and Wellspring.

“As the beneficiaries of the Skidmore Cares program for many years, Franklin Community Center has come to rely on this significant food donation, especially during this busy time of year,” said Kari Cushing, executive director of Franklin Community Center. “We truly value the relationship we have formed with Skidmore. We are proud to have them support our mission to help the less fortunate members of our community.”

Published in News
Friday, 22 November 2019 10:19

Words of Wisdom from a 93 Year-old Student

This is the work of the world’s warriors.

Tapping into the wealth of knowledge others provide will be proven to be worthwhile. You can bank on it - there’s always more to learn. 

The Exhilaration of Continuation

Lewis Taub received his formal college degree before spending 40 years working as an optometrist in Saratoga Springs. 

His wife, Marion (Sonia) Taub earned a bachelor’s degree from Radcliffe College and a masters from Columbia University at a time when women were still a minority in the higher education community. 

“My wife was brilliant – much better educated than I,” said Taub.

By the standard measure, both had completed their schooling. Taub, however, decided to follow his wife’s lead and embarked on more than 25 years of additional classes. 

“I’m taking classes in subjects I want to because I’m interested. It fills a vacuum in my education,” he said. 

At the age of 93, Lewis Taub is marking his 25th year of continuing his education with his 50th elective course at Skidmore College. 

To the nth Degree

The symbolism of the Taubs’ life journey is hung at the utmost height of their living room walls. 

Dozens of souvenirs – from figurines, to fans, to totems – form a line so long you must spin around to see them all. These mementos are evidence not only of where the Taubs have been, but what they’ve learned.

“Taking classes made the marriage stronger because we had the same interests. It opened up new horizons for us,” said Taub

Lewis and Sonia were married for 67 years before her death in 2016. They met on a three-month bicycle trip across the United States and Canada sponsored by American Youth Hostel in 1948, raised 2 children and have 4 grandchildren. Sonia was beloved in her role as a librarian at the Saratoga Springs Public Library and both earned certificates of appreciation from Skidmore College for all the courses they took.  They also traveled the world together. 

“Studying Hinduism, the Islamic Religions, Asian Art, and going to places like China, Japan, Indian, Asia, New Zealand; it made me more tolerant of other people and their religions. They’re all great. The US is only 250 years old, while cultures in India and Egypt are 5,000 years old, yet we’re trying to tell them how to run their lives,” said Taub, while shaking his head. 

“There’s a big, wide, world out there.”

Guardians of the Future

In addition to pursuing his own personal interests, Taub selects courses based on the people that will be participating in them. 

“The professor makes the course,” he said. 

This fall, he will be auditing Skidmore College Professor Gregory Spinner’s class; “Priests, Prophets, and Warriors” while also taking a SUNY Empire State College Adults in Lifelong Learning (ALL) class. At the ALL classes, Taub is able to meet other seniors while also being intellectually stimulated. It’s a different environment than what Skidmore provides.

“Skidmore wants to have a good relationship with the community but for a long time, people didn’t realize what an asset it is. They do more so, now. I take classes with young people – that’s essential. They’re brilliant. They like to party but they’re hard working and very welcoming. I find it invigorating. They give me hope for the future.” 

To audit courses at Skidmore College you must ask for the professor’s permission and pay a small fee. For more information, go to Skidmore.edu/registrar/other/audit-registration.php

Published in Lifestyle

SARATOGA SPRINGS — In honor of the 30th anniversary of the demise of the Berlin wall, Skidmore College faculty members Petra Watzke and Garett Wilson and their students erected a 28-foot-long, 9-foot-tall reconstruction of the Berlin Wall that cuts through a central pedestrian artery on campus. The structure allowed students and members of the campus community to contemplate the legacy of the notorious Cold War barrier that divided Berlin from 1961 to 1989.

On Saturday, Nov. 9, Skidmore students and faculty tore down the wall as they paused to remember the historical moment that led to the reunification of Germany. 

 The wall project was part of Watzke’s course “The Berlin Wall,” which probed the meaning of the wall in German and global history. The project was backed by Skidmore’s IdeaLab, which supports experimental approaches to learning and encourages Skidmore faculty to incorporate skills associated with collaboratively turning ideas into actual creations. The IdeaLab initiative brought Watzke together with Wilson, artistic director in the Department of Theater, who led construction of the wall.

 The unique experience was an example of integrative learning at Skidmore, in which students not only read about history, but learn through a hands-on approach involving multiple academic disciplines.

Published in Education
Thursday, 24 October 2019 17:11

Words of Wisdom from a 93 Year-old Student

This is the work of the world’s warriors.

Tapping into the wealth of knowledge others provide will be proven to be worthwhile. You can bank on it - there’s always more to learn. 

The Exhilaration of Continuation

Lewis Taub received his formal college degree before spending 40 years working as an optometrist in Saratoga Springs. 

His wife, Marion (Sonia) Taub earned a bachelor’s degree from Radcliffe College and a masters from Columbia University at a time when women were still a minority in the higher education community. 

“My wife was brilliant – much better educated than I,” said Taub.

By the standard measure, both had completed their schooling. Taub, however, decided to follow his wife’s lead and embarked on more than 25 years of additional classes. 

“I’m taking classes in subjects I want to because I’m interested. It fills a vacuum in my education,” he said. 

At the age of 93, Lewis Taub is marking his 25th year of continuing his education with his 50th elective course at Skidmore College. 

To the nth Degree

The symbolism of the Taubs’ life journey is hung at the utmost height of their living room walls. 

Dozens of souvenirs – from figurines, to fans, to totems – form a line so long you must spin around to see them all. These mementos are evidence not only of where the Taubs have been, but what they’ve learned.

“Taking classes made the marriage stronger because we had the same interests. It opened up new horizons for us,” said Taub

Lewis and Sonia were married for 67 years before her death in 2016. They met on a three-month bicycle trip across the United States and Canada sponsored by American Youth Hostel in 1948, raised 2 children and have 4 grandchildren. Sonia was beloved in her role as a librarian at the Saratoga Springs Public Library and both earned certificates of appreciation from Skidmore College for all the courses they took.  They also traveled the world together. 

“Studying Hinduism, the Islamic Religions, Asian Art, and going to places like China, Japan, Indian, Asia, New Zealand; it made me more tolerant of other people and their religions. They’re all great. The US is only 250 years old, while cultures in India and Egypt are 5,000 years old, yet we’re trying to tell them how to run their lives,” said Taub, while shaking his head. 

“There’s a big, wide, world out there.”

Guardians of the Future

In addition to pursuing his own personal interests, Taub selects courses based on the people that will be participating in them. 

“The professor makes the course,” he said. 

This fall, he will be auditing Skidmore College Professor Gregory Spinner’s class; “Priests, Prophets, and Warriors” while also taking a SUNY Empire State College Adults in Lifelong Learning (ALL) class. At the ALL classes, Taub is able to meet other seniors while also being intellectually stimulated. It’s a different environment than what Skidmore provides.

“Skidmore wants to have a good relationship with the community but for a long time, people didn’t realize what an asset it is. They do more so, now. I take classes with young people – that’s essential. They’re brilliant. They like to party but they’re hard working and very welcoming. I find it invigorating. They give me hope for the future.” 

To audit courses at Skidmore College you must ask for the professor’s permission and pay a small fee. For more information, go to Skidmore.edu/registrar/other/audit-registration.php

Published in News
Friday, 18 October 2019 11:04

A Conversation with Fred Guttenberg

SARATOGA SPRINGS — Tragedy strikes when least expected, and in the aftermath, many think of how close to home the disaster was. In 2018, a mass shooting at a Parkland Florida high school took the lives of 17 people. One of those people was the daughter of Skidmore College alumnus Fred Guttenberg. On Wednesday, Oct. 16 Guttenberg returned to his alma matter and shared the message of his nonprofit in the name of his daughter, Orange Ribbons for Jaime. 

Guttenberg is not a stranger to what many consider to be rare terrorist attacks on American Soil. Seventeen years earlier his brother was a first responder at the World Trade Center 9/11 attack in 2001. 

“On Feb 14, 2018, I sent two children to school. That’s all I did. The day started like a normal day in my house,” said Guttenberg.

Since his daughter’s funeral Guttenberg began to talk to his community not only about how tragic that day was, but how preventable that day could’ve been. He’s since spoken with members in legislation to work towards eliminating gun violence in the United States, including working with elected officials to pass Jamie’s Law, which will affect regulations of background checks to potential gun owners. 

“This is America today, 40,000 people a year die from gun violence,” said Guttenbrg. “About 23,000 a year injured because of guns…it’s not normal, it’s not okay. My mission is to cut that 40,000 in half by 10 years.”

Here in Saratoga Springs, school safety has become a hot button issue in the past year, with discussions stating how rare such attacks are, and discussions around the varying ways to be prepared. At the end of the event, Guttenberg invited members of the audience to ask questions or provide comments. And much to what may have been a surprise, but more than one person had a comment as to how they have lost someone to gun violence, which was an unfortunate reminder that gun violence and school shootings are not as rare as we would hope.

Published in Education

SARATOGA SPRINGS —  What is STREB? Choreographer Elizabeth Streb founded her company STREB EXTREME ACTION in 1985. This action-packed art is a full body muscle engaging activity that has reached new heights since it’s conception. 
The company tours nationally and internationally putting on shows that contain trampolines, parkour elements, and skilled falling. 
Skidmore College’s Tang Teaching Museum is the host of the STREB Company’s upcoming performances and workshops. On Wednesday, June 5 the first workshop was held where people of varying physical backgrounds and strengths took to the mat to learn the basic elements of the STREB techniques. 
The workshop was conducted by the company’s Associate Artistic Director, Cassandre Joseph. 
“Our technique is accessible to all. Anytime we teach a class, we keep that in mind. We don’t necessarily teach a different class for a different kind of person,” said Joseph. “Whatever group we have, it’s a personal best technique, and the idea is that the technique translates regardless.” 
Twenty participants gathered on the mat nervously eying the illustrious equipment filling the room. The workshop began with exercise drills to get everyone acquainted with the awareness of personal space and rapid directional changes. After, Joseph walked the participants through the basics of full body bracing and falling techniques. 
Later on, the group tried their hands and feet and face at a short STREB ACTION basic routine. After an hour of practice, demonstrations from STREB ACTION performers were very much needed to guide the pace and the movements. 
“A lot of the workshop is verbal. We’re constantly explaining why we’re doing things, or what we’re doing,” said Joseph. “The text really helps put things in context and makes people feel a little bit more comfortable.” 
The company will be in residence until Friday, June 21. All upcoming events including rehearsals, shows, and workshops are free and open to the public. 
Published in Sports

Photos by Christopher Massa - Skidmore College. 

SARATOGA SPRINGS — With formal degrees from both Brooklyn College and Columbia University, Dr. Lewis Taub, 93, is continuing his liberal arts education at Skidmore College. 

After retiring from a 40-year career as an ophthalmologist in Saratoga Springs, Dr. Taub began taking courses at Skidmore in 1994. 
“I didn’t have a good liberal arts education and I decided to fill that in by going to take courses at Skidmore College,” said Dr. Taub. “It was really one of the top things to do on my list when I retired, besides travel.” 
By taking a course every semester for 25 years, Dr. Taub successfully completed 150 credits from Skidmore, equating to a full liberal arts degree. Dr. Taub states that the biggest challenge he faces enrolling in school at his age is completing the reading assignments and keeping up with the younger students. 
“Just that I’m older and my brain doesn’t work as quickly as the young students’ do,” said Dr. Taub. 
While Dr. Taub feels that keeping up with the younger students poses some difficulty, his role in their class presents a positive influence to his fellow classmates. 
“We usually think about race, gender or ability when it comes to diversity, but age is just as important,” said Kate Greenberg, a senior. “His presence added a dimension we never would have had with only people our own age. His life experience enhanced our learning.” 
Most students begin to get “senioritis” as they near the end of their educational career; however, that is not the case for Dr. Taub. 
“I plan to take a course every semester at Skidmore as long as I’m alive and my brain still functions,” said Dr. Taub. 
It was his professor, Eunice Ferreira, who realized that the completion of her course would be Dr. Taub’s 50th course at Skidmore. To honor his stick-to-itiveness, she alerted the media, college president Philip A. Glotzbach, and had the class throw him a celebration on their last day of the semester. Dr. Taub appreciates her efforts and the recognition he received from President Glotzbach.  
“Lewis has taken such good advantage of the resources we offer to the Saratoga Springs community. We’re thrilled that he has been with us for so many courses and he has no doubt contributed to each of those in which he has participated,” said Philip A. Glotzbach, president of Skidmore College. 
Dr. Taub would like the people of Saratoga to know what an asset Skidmore is to the community, even beyond academics. 
“I’ve already signed up for my next class, which will be (course) 51, with Gregory Spinner in the religion department.”
Published in Education

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Touching upon themes of the Tibetan Book of the Dead, her love of dogs, her disdain for pop culture and a human planetary existence altered in dramatic ways due to a changing climate, artist/composer/musician and film director addressed a large crowd gathered inside the Tang Museum’s Payne Room where she told them, apocalyptic visions aside, her focus is: How Best To Tell The Story.

“The world is made of stories. Our own stories. Other people’s stories, (so) how do you tell a story like that, where, you know, this is going end?” Anderson said. “We’re the first people in the history of the human race who can see our own extinction coming. The first ones. Stories are things that are told to others but in this case, this is a story that’s told to no one. The first story that is:  Told. To. No one.”

Anderson’s appearance April 17 was the night two feature of the Tang Museum’s three-day Bardo Now series. George Saunders, author of the 2017 novel “Lincoln in the Bardo,” appeared via video chat on night one, in conversation with Donald S. Lopez, Jr., professor of Buddhist and Tibetan Studies at the University of Michigan and author of “The Tibetan Book of the Dead: A Biography.”

The series’ closing night featured a concert by guitarist Tashi Dorji and percussionist Susie Ibarra, performing an experimental duet conceived for the event as a musical bardo exploration.

The 90-minute presentation showcasing Anderson, a practicing Buddhist, was staged as an “in conversation” event with Benjamin Bogin, the director of the Asian Studies Program at Skidmore College.

“It’s the living bardo that’s thrilling to me,” said Anderson, when asked to connect Tibetan Buddhist themes with her creativity. “As a musician, I think the way I can most experience what you would call a bardo is in just this moment - because you don’t know what you’re going to play next,” said Anderson, noting that she doesn’t subscribe to the standard narrative form of beginning, middle and end. “That seems artificial to me. The fractured story is what I do. I respond to work where we don’t really quite know what we’re doing and what will happen next. That’s also why I’m also drawn to virtual reality. You’re making it up as you go along.

“When I first began to (improvise), I felt this incredible sense of freedom in not knowing what was going to come next, in responding to another person in a way that was absolutely in that moment - not in some other moment that you thought might be interesting - but right now. That was a big, big thrill to me as a musician.”  

Anderson screened an 11-minute segment from “Heart of a Dog,” her 2015 documentary which centers on Anderson's remembrances of her late beloved dog Lolabelle, and concludes with an image of husband Lou Reed, who died in 2013.  

“It was a film where my dog died – that was the core of it – but it was really dedicated to my teacher, Mingyur Rinpoche. One of the things I treasure about his teachings is his clarity, things like: it’s really important to practice how to feel sad, without being sad - and that distinction is a very important one because there are many, many sad things in the world and if you try to push them away, or pretend they’re not there, you’re an idiot! They will find you and they will get you,” she explained. “So, (Rinpoche’s) idea is: do not become that yourself.”   

Professor Bogin said he was struck by the film’s exploration “visually, sonically and poetically,” of bardo ideas, as Anderson narrated a series of paintings used in the film depicting Lolabelle’s journey through the 49 days of the bardo, “how memory starts flooding through the mind and you’re suddenly every single being that you’ve ever been in your life; the many beings that you are, simultaneously. 

“I think for most people who experience death, what an incredible privilege it is that that door opens…you get this chance to really look at it and feel it,” Anderson said. “I think sometimes experiencing time and death and love is sometimes easier when you look at what happens with animals and what the effects have on those creatures. You get that in a more immediate way.”

Anderson became a reluctant musical hit-maker in the early 1980s when her song “O Superman” climbed to no. 2 in the UK Pop charts alongside the likes of Rod Stewart, Elvis Costello, and The Police. It was a record she made on a $500 NEA grant in 1980.

“Anytime somebody said, ‘I want a copy of your record,’ I would walk it over to the post office. One day someone called, they spoke with a British accent, and they said: we need some copies of your record. I said, ‘OK, how many?’ They said: 40,000. by Monday.  And another 40,000 by Wednesday. I’ll. Get. Right. Back to you,” Anderson recalled. 

“So, I called up Warner Bros. Records – they’d been coming to my shows and saying: don’t you want to make a record?  I said, no, not really. But, I called them up and said: you know that record you wanted?  Can you make a bunch of them really soon? And they said: well, that’s not the way we do things at Warner Bros Records and Tapes. We’ll sign an eight-record deal. What?

“I got a lot of criticism from artists, for ‘selling out.’ A couple of months later, it was called ‘Crossing Over.’ And everyone wanted to do it.”

The song, based on a prayer by French composer Jules Massenet is about the power of technology, and of loss, Anderson said. “Technology doesn’t save you. If you think technology is going to solve your problems, you don’t understand technology - and you don’t understand your problems,” she said.

“It was really about the moment when we were going to go in and rescue the hostages. And America was going to go in and pull them out and American technology was going to shine. Then the helicopters crashed and burned in the desert,” she said, regarding the ill-fated military rescue attempt in April, 1980.

While that international success of the record made it easier for Anderson to create other things, she warns there is also a danger

“Pop Culture,” she says with disdain. “What happened? Corporate America has entered culture. It’s disturbing to me, because it’s Culture Light. It’s America’s Got Talent culture. Nothing wrong with that except when they come into your neighborhood and go: we love the community you built and now we’re going to buy it, we’re going to brand it, and sell it back to you. And we’re going to curate it while we’re at it and say what’s important and what is not.

 “We have to think about what we’re making. Now, often you see it’s just about the box office -how many people get through the doors – and it doesn’t really matter what the experience is. I do think that there’s art for everybody – but it’s a tricky thing, to make sure that it’s not just so watered down that it’s just feel-good stuff.” 

 

The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery is located on the campus of Skidmore College On exhibit through May 19: The Second Buddha: Master of Time presents the story of the legendary Indian Buddhist master Padmasambhava - widely credited with bringing Buddhism to the Tibetan lands. The exhibit features Tibetan scroll paintings (thangkas), textiles, and manuscripts from the 13th through 19th centuries.

Published in Entertainment

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Renowned performance artist and practicing Buddhist Laurie Anderson will take part in the Tang Museum’s Dunkerley Dialogues on April 17 – night two of the museum’s three-night “Bardo Now” events.

Anderson first gained widespread attention with her song "O Superman," in the early 1980s. Other major recordings include “Big Science,” “Mister Heartbreak,” “Strange Angels,” and “Home of the Brave,” among others.  Major performance pieces include United States I-V, Empty Places, The Nerve Bible, and Songs and Stories for Moby Dick.

Anderson spent time in the early 1970s as an artist-in-residence at the ZBS Foundation’s 33-acre complex on the Hudson River between the villages of Schuylerville and Fort Edward. Anderson met songwriter Lou Reed in the 1990’s and the two were later wed. She released her emotionally moving and highly acclaimed documentary film “Heart of A Dog” in 2015.

The Tang Museum, “Bardo Now,” April 16-18.

Schedule:

- 6 p.m., Tuesday, April 16 - A discussion of George Saunders’ acclaimed novel, "Lincoln in the Bardo."

- 6 p.m., Wednesday, April 17 - A talk with performance artist and practicing Buddhist, Laurie Anderson and Benjamin Bogin, director of the Asian studies program at Skidmore College.

- 6 p.m., Thursday, April 18 - Concert by guitarist, Tashi Dorji and percussionist, Susie Ibarra, performing an experimental duet conceived for this event as a musical Bardo exploration.

Events are free and open to the public and are held in conjunction with the exhibition “The Second Buddha: Master of Time,” which explores the life, legend, and legacy of Padmasambhava, a tantric master who is an iconic figure in Tibetan culture, celebrated as “The Second Buddha” and credited for bringing Buddhism to Tibet. The concept of the bardo is described in “The Tibetan Book of the Dead,” which is attributed to Padmasambhava.

The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College, 815 North Broadway. For more information, call 518-580-8080.

Published in Entertainment
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