Displaying items by tag: Compliments to the Chef, Paula and John Reardon

Thursday, 23 September 2021 13:32

“I Peel Good!”

Hello my Foodie Friends! 

Back in early August, Paula and I had the opportunity to visit a beautiful part of our country to attend our treasured friend son’s and our son’s best friend’s wedding being held in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. If you have never seen the Grand Tetons’ or Yellowstone Park, you need to put it as a “must” on your list. Part of Teton Village is a quaint historical inn called the Alpenhof Lodge. It is one of the original hotels in the village. It provides a warm, cozy, welcoming environment with a restaurant that offers tasty Alps-inspired food. Each morning we were offered a menu selection that included offerings from the Alps region that really highlighted some of the most unique and exciting European cooking with Swiss, German, Austrian influences.

One of my favorite breakfast foods was Rösti with ham and eggs. Rösti is a Swiss shredded potato casserole that’s perfect for brunch. It comes out of the oven, brown and crisp on the edges, melting cheese in the middle, soft-cooked eggs on top. Swiss Rösti recipe is more like a pancake than a casserole. It’s made by pressing shredded potatoes into a cast iron skillet to form a cake, and cooking it in hot butter until it’s brown on the outside and soft inside. Back in the early 1800’s this was a common farmer’s breakfast – cooked over the fire in a wood stove. Nowadays in Switzerland Rösti is served for breakfast, lunch or dinner and sometimes as a hearty side dish with meat.

To make this dish and many others that require peeling, we carry one of our favorite and best-selling kitchen tools; the Kuhn Rikon Swiss peeler. The Kuhn Rikon vegetable peeler can be one of the mandatory items that chef’s require you to come to work with and as part of the every-day kitchen. 

The Kuhn Rikon peeler has a little hole at the end, and you just loop your index finger into it, gripping the peeler with your thumb and middle finger; all you have to do to peel a vegetable is just pull. The flexibility of this peeler is fantastic — it curves around whatever vegetable you are peeling. You can peel using the entire blade — other peelers don’t allow you to do that. It is super light. It is easy to clean because it has no nooks, and easy to store because it has the hole, so you can hang it on a hook. And this design provides the most comfortable way to peel, and you don’t have to worry about nicking the end of your fingers.  Sometimes with kitchen tools you want complex, awesome technology, but sometimes you just want the simplest thing ever, and this is it—simplicity at its best. It’s the most efficient peeler that’s out there. Many of the Chef’s in the area will buy 10 at a time.  The ergonomic design works in right or left hand.

Stop by Compliments to the Chef, your Neighborhood Kitchen and Cutlery store for your culinary needs. Trying out international food recipes and doing them in an easy and quick way is a fun way to learn about the different cultures of the world. The wedding in Wyoming was absolutely beautiful with a week filled with lifelong memories. Congratulations to Brad and Julia for a lifetime of magnificent adventures and happiness. Remember my Foodie Friends: “Life Happens in the Kitchen.”

Take Care,
John & Paula

REARDON StrawberryCreamSwissRoll 

Published in Food
Thursday, 16 September 2021 11:58

Milling is Thrilling

Hello my Foodie Friends! 

Early September begins the harvesting of summer plants. To harvest is considered a time to pick and gather what you sow. This season begins the time where farmers till their fields and ready the land for the next planting. Harvest time includes picking of foods such as cranberries, tomatoes, peppers, basil and Italian herbs, summer squash, corn, peaches, and apricots. Pureeing and canning many of these products has become a seasonal project for our foodies. Harvest making includes making apple/peach/pear butters, making tomato sauce and putting pureed pumpkin in the freezer. 

From turning cooked apples into wholesome applesauce, freshly stewed tomatoes into a classic marinara, or steamed potatoes into a mash, the food mill proves its standing by being masterful with ingredients that are notoriously fussy to prep. Think of a food mill as being the low-tech version of a food processor—there’s no plug or motor, just a hand-crank that moves with a little help from you and your biceps. What can a food mill do that a processor can’t? Just ask any homesteader or canning enthusiast what their favorite time-saving tools are, and you can bet the food mill is right up there at the top of the list. This is because a foodmill can simultaneously purée and strain foods so efficiently that it renders the once tedious task of peeling fruit and vegetables obsolete.

A standard food mill consists of three parts: a bowl, a perforated plate that sits at the bottom, and the aforementioned hand-crank that is responsible for moving the metal blade that pushes the food through the plate. The result of this old-timey churning is a smooth purée without a seed, peel, pit, or stem in sight. The Food Mill is a tool that allows for fine and coarse milling. The changeable bottoms give you the ability to seed your harvest by the bushel. The food mill is a cross between a food processor and a sieve. You turn the handle and an angled blade presses the contents of the mill through a perforated disk, keeping any remnants like seeds or skin safely out of your puree. Unlike a food processor or a blender, a food mill does not incorporate air into the puree altering its texture. The result is a denser puree that is ideal for foods like applesauce or tomato sauce. Many of today’s food mills are designed to fit snugly over a vessel that catches the puree allowing you to mill in place with one hand while simultaneously cranking with the other.

Stop by Compliments to the Chef, your Neighborhood Kitchen and Cutlery store this harvest season to pick up the essentials you need for your culinary delights. Have a thrilling time milling your harvest. Happy milling!! Remember my Foodie Friends, “Life Happens in the Kitchen!” 

Take Care,
John & Paula

REARDON StrawberryCreamSwissRoll 

Published in Food
Thursday, 09 September 2021 15:45

“I Tasted Life” - Emily Dickinson

Hello my Foodie Friends! 

With life, we are always seeking new experiences, and with food, new tastes. Who doesn’t taste their food when they’re cooking? Tasting what you make is such a fundamental principle in preparing good food. There is something magical about the act of preparing meals and eating together. It is an act of giving and sharing. Our relationship with cooking can become more adventurous with trying out new culinary skills and recipes we have wanted to try. In preparing that special culinary creation, there may be some cool culinary tools you need to help.

One tool that has become a “must have” in the kitchen drawer is the bench scraper. A bench scraper, which is also called a pastry scraper or dough scraper, is also used in working with pastry, bread, and other doughs. But even if you don’t bake regularly, it can still be a worthy investment for general cooking prep. It’s also space-efficient and easy to stow away in a prep drawer and is a crazy-easy-to-clean, dishwasher-safe tool that can last you for decades. A bench scraper is one of those inexpensive utensils that lasts a lifetime and has a million uses. 

When chopping vegetables, a bench scraper makes short work of transferring the veggies from the cutting board to the skillet or soup pot without losing half the veggies onto the floor during the transfer. Think of that flat piece of metal as a wide extension of your hand. Imagine the joy you would feel by only making ONE journey from your cutting board to your soup pot instead of your usual six trips as you balance those diced veggies on your knife or in your hand. You can also use your trusty scraper to smash whole cloves of garlic or to smash boiled potatoes before frying them.

Stop by Compliments to the Chef, your Neighborhood Kitchen and Cutlery store located at 33 Railroad Place, to find those cool tools that can help you as you plan out your menus and get chopping. Relish the memories of cooking and eating together as a family! Try out some new tastes and flavors this season. Follow your taste buds and try new things. Remember my Foodie Friends, “Life Happens in the Kitchen,” 

Take Care,
John & Paula

REARDON StrawberryCreamSwissRoll 

Published in Food
Thursday, 02 September 2021 14:40

“How do you like them Apples?”

Hello my Foodie Friends! 

The summer went by so quickly! September is a beautiful month. Not only does it mark cooler days and evenings, it is also a harvest month. Seeing the ripening apples on the trees reminds me that it’s Back-to-School time. Who doesn’t like a crisp sweet apple in the Fall? So many delicious apples are grown in this region. Many of you may already know this, but the apple is New York’s state fruit. Another fun fact is New York is the second-largest apple producing state in the United States, averaging 25 million bushels of production annually with varieties that include; McIntosh, Empire, Red Delicious, Cortland, Golden Delicious, Rome, Crispin, Gala, Fuji, and many others. 

Did you recently go apple picking and now don’t know what to do with all those apples? Sure it’s great to eat an apple as a snack on its own (or maybe dunked in salted caramel sauce), but you are probably in need of some apple recipes so they do not go to waste. I swear, apples sometimes multiply in the bags after picking them... that, or I just don’t realize how many apples I’ll truly end up with when I pick a bushel. Making desserts and dishes with apples is endless. There are so many ways to prepare apples like; Apple sauce, apple butter, apple pie, poached apples, caramel apples, apple cake, apple muffins, apple cider donuts (yum), apple chutney, or even apples in a Sangria. 

When we get our bushel of apples home, well, first we eat some of them raw – delicious! Then we get creative and make lots of tasty creations with our apple picks. And of course, we use the best tools.

There are cool culinary tools available to help you with your apple creations, At Compliments to the Chef, Your Neighborhood Kitchen and Cutlery store, we have apple peeling machines, apple slicers, mandolins, and even cookie cutters. Cookie cutters are a fun way to dress up a dessert, or get kids involved and eating new foods. Cutting apples into stars, hearts, or even letters is tedious but a fun surprise to include in their school lunch for special occasions. A mandolin lets you cut apples into different widths or with crimped edges. It’s great for making the base of an apple sandwich and can also dress up any snack plate. If you want to secure the apple, but get rid of the core, use an apple corer. This distinctive tool easily removes the core and makes disposal quick and effortless. The unique leveler splits in half for easy release after you twist or push the corer through the apple. 

So, how do you like them apples? Have a wonderful time with your family and friends. Enjoy the harvest moon while listening to Neil Young’s “Harvest Moon” (one of our favorite songs). Remember my Foodie Friends, “Life Happens in the Kitchen” under the harvest moon.

Take Care,
John & Paula

REARDON StrawberryCreamSwissRoll 

Published in Food
Thursday, 26 August 2021 14:07

“We don’t need a recipe, we are Italian”

Hello my Foodie Friends! 

Today is my mother-in-law’s 89th birthday. We have been blessed to have her in our lives for so many years. This coming week would have also have been my mother’s birthday. Both my mother and mother-in-law come from the Depression era with their Italian heritage being Sicilian and Neapolitan.  For both mothers, the meal and the preparation of the meal was the most important part of the day. Italians hold food and cooking and ingredients and mealtime in high regard. They value a good meal and even more when it is in good company. Over the years, the quest to learn the family recipes has resulted in a form of translation into recipes. Even to this day when my wife attempts to teach our daughter the family recipe for her sauce (gravy), it becomes difficult since it was really the taste that was handed down over the generations. The most common response when learning the family recipes from her mother and grandmother was “this is how you make…” There was nothing written down. Italian dishes are tweaked and improvised all the time. But it’s about learning the cuisine like you learn the grammar of a language - there are forms and structures you need to master. There are underlying frameworks of how ingredients are thought of and how they come together and also cooking techniques, styles of presentation and the order and structure of a meal which all combined form the Italian cuisine language. If you don’t know any of this, then of course you run the risk of making things that any Italian will find a little off. This doesn’t necessarily mean these creations are bad - it just means that they won’t seem Italian anymore, even if they’re not unpleasant or even are very good. People from within a certain food culture (or who know it like a native) can just “tell” when something tastes like it was made by someone who understands the palette of that cuisine.

Throughout the generations, having the right pots and tools are as important as putting together the meal.  There are important essential tools you need for making the foods from our various cultures. What difference could a pan make to the final result? Well, a risotto made in a paella pan would never have the soft gluey quality of a good risotto. A saute’ pan or a good sauce pan is important. The saute’, because of its depth and curved sides, is better for braising meat or vegetables than a frying pan. The straight sides on a sauté pan do a better job of locking in moisture, making it ideal for braising chicken thighs or sausages until they are juicy and tender. 

Pasta should be cooked in a cylindrical pot so the water returns to the boil more quickly once you have added the pasta, preventing the shapes from sticking together. Important essential tools to have include; having a Dutch oven the thick cast-iron walls also retain heat for a long time, making it the perfect serving vessel for bringing your food right to the table. Your soup or pasta will stay warm while people help themselves from the big pot. The “spider” is a small strainer basket that makes it easy to pluck pasta and gnocchi out of the pasta pot and dump it right into your simmering pan of sauce. Just the right amount of pasta water carries over, plus you don’t have to schlep a big pot of boiling water to the sink to drain. These are just a “few” of the cool tools you can use to help you with your work. 

Stop by Compliments to the Chef, your Neighborhood Kitchen and Cutlery store, to get the tools you need to make your special meal. We have the pots and pans, and many other accouterments’ you need to make that meal. Every family has a favorite recipe. Ask family members to teach you the traditional recipes that have endured over the generations. Even with lost traditions, there is always something new to learn with food. Remember my Foodie Friends: “Life Happens in the Kitchen.”

Take Care,
John & Paula

REARDON StrawberryCreamSwissRoll 

Published in Food
Thursday, 19 August 2021 13:08

Food on a Stick

Hello my Foodie Friends! 

Grilling in our backyards during the month of August is among my favorite summertime pastimes. Your BBQ, grilling, and outdoor cooking missions can eventually bring you to one of life’s simple joys: meat on a stick. One tool that can help those who are firing up in the backyard is the skewer. Creating food on a stick offers the ability to be creative and to offer various food choices for your family and guests. Serving food on a stick is not only convenient, but it’s also fun! Skewers can be made of bamboo, flexible stainless steel or stainless steel. Finding the right skewer for your grilling mission is key since skewers come in a variety of lengths and shapes, with handle embellishments and smart features. If you’re using a grill with a lid, make sure you choose a skewer length that will allow you to close the grill lid. Metal skewers now come in flat, round, spiral, or square shapes, and some also have double shafts. A square or spiral shape is especially helpful in keeping foods from sliding off the skewer or spinning around the shaft as you turn them on the grill. If you’re already working with spinning skewers (round metal or wooden), you can try using tongs to cradle the foods as you turn them and keep things grilling evenly.

Shish kabobs, usually just called kabobs, refers to meat and vegetables cut into one inch cubes and put on a skewer. “Kabobs,” translated, simply means a meat dish of Middle Eastern origins. In America, most skewered meats and vegetables have been come to be known as kabobs. Some common ingredients for a kabob is onion, bell pepper, various meats, mushrooms, and a variety of other foods. There are many specialties of various skewered meat dishes from all around the world, but in America, kabob has come to mean any of them. While kabobs are not necessarily always cooked on a grill, they usually are. This allows the meat to take on the smoky grill flavor as well as get a nice char on it. With wooden skewers, the skewer has a nice char as well. The key to grilling great kabobs is making sure they cook evenly. Make sure before you place anything on the grill, it’s at medium temperature. Then, as the kabobs cook, rotate them regularly, so they don’t burn on one side while being raw on the other.

If you’re going to make shish kebabs with both meat and veggies, you must precook the meat so that you’re just heating it. Otherwise, by the time the meat is cooked, the veggies will be charcoal. Also, make sure the foods that take longer to cook (like onions and peppers) are cut into smaller pieces than the quick-cooking foods (like pineapple and cherry tomatoes) so that nothing burns. 

Other skew suggestions: Fruit skewers. Just like above, you can put similarly sized chunks of fruit onto a skewer, chill, and serve. It’s even better if you serve a yogurt or cream cheese dip or chocolate fondue with them.

Fresh veggie skewers. Whether you cook them or not, a skewer makes veggies infinitely more appealing to children. The novelty might get veggies into little tummies where they otherwise would not go. As with the fruit, if you serve a dip with them, they might go over better. Or, forget the kids and make grilled mushrooms to add to a steak.

This summer let the aspiring little chefs’ help create unique and memorable food on a stick. Stop by Compliments to the Chef, your Neighborhood Kitchen and Cutlery store, for an assortment of skewers to help you create your food on the stick creations. Remember my Foodie Friends, “Life Happens in the Kitchen!”

Take Care,
John & Paula

REARDON StrawberryCreamSwissRoll 

Published in Food
Thursday, 12 August 2021 14:31

“Love is All Around”

Hello my Foodie Friends! 

August can be a very warm month and it becomes a quest to stay cool. We tend to eat lighter and refreshing foods during this time of year. One of my favorite summer combos is strawberries and cream.  Our children love waffles with strawberries and whipped cream. When they were younger they probably could have eaten it every single day and not get sick of it.  This combo is also great on or in cake such as a gorgeous Swiss roll.  This is a perfectly refreshing summer dessert that is loved by all! Cake rolls look really fancy as well as complicated but they are actually quite easy to make. One essential item you need to make a cake roll is a jelly roll pan. A jelly roll pan (typically 10½ by 15½ inches) is simply a smaller version of a rimmed baking sheet (about 12 by 18 inches). When it comes to equipping your kitchen, baking sheets are more versatile. You can use one to roast a large batch of vegetables, bake a dozen or more cookies, or even make a large sheet cake. A jelly-roll pan has 1-inch-high sides and is perfect for making cake rolls; it can stand in for a cookie sheet in a pinch.

Love is all around especially when we bring and serve fantastic desserts. We have a ton of bakeware to assist with your fun summer culinary desserts. We also have strawberry hullers and slicers to help you with your strawberry desserts. Stop by Compliments to the Chef, your Neighborhood Kitchen and Cutlery store for those “cool dessert” culinary needs. Remember my Foodie Friends; “Life Happens in the Kitchen!.” 

Take Care,
John & Paula

REARDON StrawberryCreamSwissRoll 

Published in Food
Thursday, 05 August 2021 16:38

Flash Back Friday

Hello my Foodie Friends! 

Part of the American summer road trip can include visits to roadside diners. What is your favorite childhood memory of summer food? I have so many childhood memories of eating with my family. My father was a truck driver so he loved to travel and make a day of driving around the American landscape. We would mostly go through Vermont which is where he grew up. He loved stopping at a local diner as part of our day’s exploration. My father loved diners! The reason being that diners are best known for their history, tradition, an extensive menu selection, large portions of comfort foods at fair prices, quick service served with diner spirit and hearty meals. Chefs and cooks showcased their occupational skill and skillet set through offering huge portions of comfort food classics, while no- nonsense but friendly waitresses served as unofficial family to customers with their welcoming ways. Locals, many with townie and patriotic tendencies, interacted through face-to-face spoken words instead of through technological devices. Truck drivers sat at the counter after long days and nights of life on the road. White collar America, some as business travelers walking briskly over from the adjacent hotel, took that well-deserved break from another anticipated day in the rat race to lighten the day with some home-cooked food. Landscapers and construction workers with clean hands, for now, were hungry, immediately decisive on what to order, and needing to get to work soon. They wasted no time ordering food while showing a close camaraderie as if they were brothers. 

You see, there’s really nothing like eating at a good old-fashioned diner when traveling the small towns and back roads. The experience, quite simply, brings a wonderful slice of American tradition to the senses and taste buds that can only be fully realized by frequenting these local treasures. The diner is an icon of American culture located in almost every city and town. 

I read a fun article about diners on Reminisce.com with some pretty funny diner slang that let the short order cook know what to burn, what to wrack , and what to put a hat on. It is considered “short-order shorthand. As I read these I laughed, while bringing back memories of eating at a diner with my family. By the way; I still love stopping by some of the mainstay diners throughout the northeast. 

Here is a small sampling of the article. Try to guess what the slang means before you read the answer: 

Breakfast: 

Adam and Eve on a raft………………………(poached eggs on toast)

Burn the British………………………………(English Muffin, toasted)

Sinkers and suds…………………………… (Doughnuts and Coffee)

Wreck’em…………………………………….(Scrambled eggs)

Lunch

Bloodhound in the hay………………………(Hot dog with sauerkraut)

Two cows, make ‘em cry……………………(Two burgers with onions)

First Lady……………………………………(Spareribs)

Condiments 

Axel grease………………………………….(Butter)

Paint it red………………………………… .(Ketchup)

Warts………………………………………..(0lives)

Dessert

Eve with a lid on it…………………………(Apple Pie)

Fish eyes……………………………………(Tapioca Pudding)

Houseboat…………………………………..(Banana Split)

Nervous pudding……………………………(Jello) 

This summer, make food memories with your family. My childhood memories almost always include sitting at the table eating with my four siblings, and my parents. Stop by Compliments to the Chef, your neighborhood kitchen and cutlery store located at 33 Railroad Place to help you with your family culinary needs. Remember my Foodie Friends: “Life Happens in the Kitchen.” 

Take Care,
John & Paula

 REARDON SummerBurgers

Published in Food
Thursday, 29 July 2021 14:36

The World is Your Oyster

Hello my Foodie Friends! 

Our American English language has many common expressions we use to express ideas. For example: when we say something is like “a drop in the ocean,” we mean it is a very small amount compared to what is needed. You may also hear the expression “drop in the bucket.” But a drop in the ocean is much more dramatic. If someone is “slippery as an eel,” they are tricky and difficult to catch. We often use this expression as a warning to others. If something is a “whale of a … thing,” it is a very good thing. If you performed very well at work, your boss could say you did “a whale of a job.”

Some people consider oysters a delicacy – a rare food that you only eat once in a while. Oysters are great for another reason. They make pearls! So, oysters are rare indeed. And that brings us to our next expression. When we say “The world is your oyster!” we mean that you are able to make the most out of life. You take every chance given to you and put it to good use. Language experts say this is one of the many expressions created by the English writer William Shakespeare. He used it in his play The Merry Wives of Windsor. However, some people use this expression a little differently. It can also mean that you have every chance or opportunity you could possibly want. You have money, skills, ability and freedom to do exactly what you want. 

Oysters are a delicious sea food to eat this time of year. Raw oysters are great—but do you know what’s not great? Trying to shuck them at home? For most people, shucking them isn’t the easiest thing to do. We have just the tool to help you with shucking oysters. The Zyliss Oyster Tool helps you shuck oysters quickly while keeping hands safe. The specialty designed stainless steel blade opens oysters safely and easily while preserving oyster liquor and features a non-slip handle with protective guard. The silicone oyster pocket and non-slip feet provides leverage while keeping hands safe during use. No need for a bulky glove! Also features a built-in knife holder for safe easy storage. Focusing on functionality, durability, design, cleanliness and safety, Zyliss has relied upon a heritage of excellence that began in Switzerland over 60 years ago. Building on this time-held tradition, the company has advanced to produce and distribute kitchen equipment that is world-renowned. Zyliss has pioneered the design of more than 200 kitchen essentials, with quality and engineering that cannot be duplicated.

Did you know that oysters are delicious mollusks that provide the human body with a number of unique nutrients and minerals, which result in great health benefits These include the ability of oysters to aid in weight loss, boost metabolic activity, increase tissue repair and growth, lower cholesterol levels, reduce blood pressure, improve immune functions, aid in wound healing, and promote healthy growth. Furthermore, they are a powerful aphrodisiac, can improve blood circulation, and also increase bone strength to reduce osteoporosis. If you’ve never prepared oysters yourself, it can be intimidating. But it can also be easy and a great experience. Give oysters a try and be sure to remember the following:

• Buy oysters from reliable vendors (whether grocer or fishmonger) and be sure to look for the shipper’s tag. That way you’ll know the oysters came from an area that is approved for growing and harvesting oysters.

• Check through your oysters when you get home. Always throw away any oysters that don’t seem right, have broken shells, or that are partially or fully opened. You can try to tap the open oysters to see if they close up. If they do, they should be OK. If not, toss them.

• Prepare fresh, live oysters for eating. Consider serving them the day you buy them.

• Keep your oysters very cold before prepping them. Don’t store them in a plastic bag in the fridge, but put them in a bowl covered with a wet towel.

Stop by Compliments to the Chef, your Neighborhood Kitchen and Cutlery store, for the Zyliss Oyster Tool. It will make your life a bit easier. Have fun shucking with family and friends. The world is your oyster. All the options are available to you… the world is yours for the taking, whatever you make of it. Getting the pearl requires the oyster to be opened. But despite the hardness of the oyster shell, they can be opened with ease. Enjoy life. Remember my Foodie Friends: “Life Happens in the Kitchen.” Happy shucking.

Take Care,
John & Paula

 REARDON SummerBurgers

Published in Food
Thursday, 22 July 2021 14:59

Life Happens... Cheeseburgers Help

Hello my Foodie Friends! 

Grilling up burgers is a summertime staple for many of us. How do you like your burgers? When you got your burger fresh off the grill and sitting there all juicy and delicious on that bun…how do you make this perfect food even more perfect? Cheese is a good choice. But which one? American? Cheddar? Swiss? Maybe some crisp, smoky bacon. How about barbecue sauce? We could go on forever. Making hamburgers seems like something that should be simple—how hard can it be to cook those beefy delights? Yet somehow, nailing the perfect burger can elude even the most seasoned home cook. Make the patty too thick and you risk biting into a raw mess. Leave it on the heat for too long, and it’ll end up dry. The secret to making juicy burgers at home is all in the meat. Did you burn your burgers while cooking them? The culprit is likely uneven thickness. While the shape of the patty doesn’t matter, the thickness does. You really want to make sure the patty is a uniform, even thickness, or it’s not going to cook properly, which can lead to a burnt outside and undercooked inside. A solution could be to flatten the patties by pressing them flat using a burger press. 

Burger presses create consistently shaped and sized burgers. The presses allow you to pack patties without squishing the meat between your warm hands. Heat radiated by your hands can cause proteins to denature. Using your hands to pack raw meat can cause the fat to melt and the meat to break apart which causes a mushy, unappealing texture when it’s time to devour your burger. The burger presses make uniform patties: same weight and diameter every time. Uniform patties cook evenly throughout and will come to temperature around the same time on the grill.

The presses also help achieve the weight you’re going for ¼, ⅓, and ½ lb patties. And you get a prettier burger patty. The burgers look good. Who doesn’t marvel at a perfectly round, evenly dense patty?

Elevate your grilling game this summer with less stressing and more pressing. Get the tools you need to make the burgers you yearn for. Stop by Compliments to the Chef, your Neighborhood Kitchen and Cutlery store for the burger presses and other cool tools to help you with your burger creations. Maybe even put on the SNL‘Cheeseburger Cheeseburger’ sketch with the original SNL cast. The classic skit of John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd at the Olympia diner yelling: “Cheeseburger and a Coke,” “Ah… no Coke… ah Pepsi,” replies Belushi. (And that’s the first time the catch phrase is uttered.) “Okay, Pepsi and french fries.”, “No fries… chips.” “Okay, chips.” Belushi barks out the order to Aykroyd: “One cheeburger, one Pepsi… chips.” “Cheeseburger,” confirms Aykroyd. And SNL history is made!! Have fun laughing and cooking. Remember my Foodie Friends, “Life Happens in the Kitchen” or even the grill. 

Take Care,
John & Paula

 REARDON SummerBurgers

Published in Food
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