Displaying items by tag: Saratoga Farmers' Market

Ayurveda is the sister science of yoga and translates to “science of life.” Application of Ayurveda requires foundational knowledge of three constitutions, called doshas. Doshas are energetic systems of the body that influence body type and characteristics.

There are three doshas, Vata, Pitta, and Kapha, derived from the five natural elements; air, ether, water, fire, earth. Vata is composed of air and ether (think light, flowing, movement). Pitta is of fire and water (think powerful, transformational, bold). Kapha is of earth and water (think grounded, calm, cohesion). In short, the goal of Ayurveda is to keep these doshas balanced for good health. 

What you eat influences your doshic health. Seasonal, organic, and local fresh foods are the best to consider for dosha balance. Ayurveda’s taste types are sweet, sour, salty, pungent, astringent, and bitter. Each taste has a specific effect and can be aggravating or balancing to a dosha type. For example, pungent foods like hot spices, garlic, onions, chiles- which stimulate digestion- can aggravate Pitta and Vata but can balance Kapha. On the other hand, oils can aggravate Kapha but balance Pitta and Vata. These elemental influences are not only present in your body but correspond to the seasons and climate. 

Enjoy these simple recipes, using ingredients you can find at the Saratoga Farmers’ Market! Use as a main dish for vegan and vegetarian options, or pair with a meat protein. You can find turkey, chicken, beef, fish, pork, goat, veal, and lamb at the farmers’ market. [Ramble Creek Farm, Squashville Farm, Longlesson Farm, Bunker Hill Creamery, Hebron Valley Veal, Pura Vida Fisheries, Moxie Ridge Farm,  Elihu Farm]. Don’t forget to stop by Muddy Trail Jerky Co. to spice things up. Moon Cycle Seed Company recommends these recipes for hormone health and to pair with your seed cycling protocol for women’s health.

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is open Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Find us online at saratogafarmersmarket.org and follow us on Facebook and Instagram. For online pre-ordering and curbside pickup, visit localline.ca/saratoga-farmers-market.

FM GingerCarrotSoup

FM RootVeggieSautee

Published in Food
Thursday, 11 March 2021 14:19

A ‘New Normal’ for Saratoga Farmers Market?

The outdoor season for the Saratoga Farmers Market begins in eight weeks. What will that mean for vendors, market staff, and the market’s many loyal shoppers as Saratoga and its surrounding communities start to emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic?

The market was in a state of flux, even before the pandemic. It moved its indoor location in 2019 from the Saratoga Spa State Park, where it had been for six years, to the Wilton Mall. The market shut down for a week in March 2020 when the strictest restrictions were imposed but was able to reopen quickly by moving outdoors to the empty mall parking lot outside the shuttered Bon Ton. Summer construction work and continued safety concerns made a return to its traditional outdoor locale at High Rock Park impossible, so the market remained at the mall.

That decision proved successful in keeping the market strong, says Mark Bascom, co-owner of Owl Wood Farm and president of the market association’s board. “It wouldn’t have been possible without our dedicated customers who have kept on supporting us through our transitions.”

Now, with a new outdoor season approaching, the market is unsure where its summer home will be.

Bascom said a survey of vendors shows they are split between moving back to the park or remaining at the mall. The market board plans to survey customers, as well.

The mall’s outdoor parking lots are spacious, which creates space for many vendors to operate with appropriate distances between them. Creating that kind of space at and around High Rock Park would require some reconfiguring, says market manager Emily Meagher. Still, to many vendors and shoppers, High Rock is home.

Overall, farmers’ markets nationally have had an increase in business throughout the pandemic, according to retail analysts. This increase has been somewhat true for the Saratoga Farmers Market, as well.

“During the first few months of the pandemic, when farmers’ markets seemed to be one of the only trusted places to shop, business was really booming for our food vendors,” says Meagher. “That was due in large part to being outside.” 

“When we moved back indoors, our market tapered down,” she added. “That’s to be expected. A lot of our customers just don’t feel comfortable shopping indoors right now.”

The market has responded to that discomfort by establishing an online pre-ordering service. Customers can access the online shopping service at localline.ca/saratoga-farmers-market or through the farmers’ market’s website saratogafarmersmarket.org. Online shoppers may view offerings from 9 p.m. Monday through 9 p.m. Thursday and place orders for a large variety of goods. Market staff gather the items from vendors and package them for customers to pick up at a site just outside the market.

Some vendors also have chosen to cease attending because of safety concerns. However, newer vendors have joined and are energizing the market as “customers catch on to their presence and the high-quality products they offer,” Meagher says.

Other vendors are learning to adjust to changing conditions. Beth Trattel of Something’s Brewing used to draw much of her business from sales of hot and cold beverages sold on the spot. Those sales have fallen as customers have begun visiting the market more to shop and less to hang out. However, Trattel has seen more robust sales of her fresh-roasted coffee beans that customers take home to make. This shift also has been real for some prepared food vendors. Giovanni Fresco, for instance, offers take-home meals as well as fresh pasta. 

Bascom said warmer weather might allow the market to move outdoors earlier than usual, which would help ease safety concerns. “Farmers' markets always are changing,” he says. “That keeps things interesting for the customer. But overall, we are glad that they are viewed as an integral part of the food system.”

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is open Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Find us online at saratogafarmersmarket.org and follow us on Facebook and Instagram. For online pre-ordering and curbside pickup, visit localline.ca/saratoga-farmers-market.

Published in Food
Thursday, 11 March 2021 14:19

Let the Stories Begin

Hello my Foodie Friends! 

St. Patrick’s Day is just around the corner.  My mother, who was Italian, used to say “Everyone is Irish on St. Patty’s day.” My father, who was Irish, always agreed because if he didn’t he ran the risk of not getting her delicious Corned Beef and Cabbage and a cold tall glass of beer. My dad’s best friends were all my Mom’s brothers and nephews, who were all very Italian. On this holiday, he was treated almost as though it was his birthday.  He loved celebrating the day. He would get all of the family members to sing Irish songs and drink green beer. There were always very “interesting” stories to be had as well. So here is to all of our “Irish” lads and lassies.

Is your St. Patrick’s Day incomplete without a pint of green beer? If you have been enjoying an emerald-colored beer at the bar year after year and now want to make it at home, it may just surprise you how easy it actually is. Green beer is a novelty that American drinkers have latched onto and it has quickly become the drink to have each and every St. Patrick’s Day. There is something appealing about turning everything green on the Irish holiday and beer just happens to be one of the most popular items to play with.

There is no trick to making green beer and it requires no special bartending skills. It is, quite simply, a light-colored beer that has a drop of green food coloring added to it. The flavor does not change, only the color. It should be noted that if you want to drink like a real Irishman and celebrate the Emerald Isle’s heritage, nothing is more appropriate than a pint of Guinness or a shot of Irish whiskey. Any beer will work when making green beer; however, some produce a brighter green color than others.

To get the greenest of beers, begin with a light-colored brew. This includes any of the popular American lagers like Budweiser, Miller, Busch, or Coors. Those are favorite beers and, given the novelty aspect of green beer, may be the best choice.

However, do not forget about all of the great pale-colored craft beers, the amazing German pilsners, and any of the other higher quality beers that are available today. The beer market is vast and there are many more choices than those from the giant breweries.

If you would like to play around with a darker beer, you will find an interesting effect. Stouts and other dark beers have a rich color that is not transparent enough to allow the green food coloring to give that signature emerald green beer look.

However, the body of the beer will turn darker and have a slight evergreen hue in the right light. The coolest part is the head because the foam will pick up the food coloring and, though it may not last long, take on that green color. Green beer is fun and food coloring is cheap, so feel free to play with it.

At Compliments to the Chef, your Neighborhood Kitchen and Cutlery store, we carry various types of glasses to help accommodate your St. Patrick’s Day celebration. Traditional Irish toasts are a must on St. Patrick’s Day, so you’ll want to be ready with a list of toasts under your lucky green belt if you’re called upon to utter a few wise, witty or wry words of Irish good cheer before the beer disappears. Stop by for any of the items you need to make your Corned beef and cabbage or the Irish Soda Bread to go with it. Wishing you all a Happy and safe St. Patrick’s Day. Share the stories of days gone by. Remember my Foodie Friends, “Life Happens in the Kitchen.”

 Take Care,
John & PaulaREARDON IrishSodaBread

Published in Food
Thursday, 04 March 2021 15:01

Like “Buttah”

Hello my Foodie Friends! 

I love watching vintage SNL (Saturday Night Live) shows. Among my favorites is a classic skit of Mike Meyers playing Liz Rosenberg in “Coffee Talk.” During the “Coffee Talk” sketch featuring Mike Myers, Madonna, and Roseanne Barr; Barbra Streisand made a surprise appearance! In the skit, the three ladies from Queens had all finished saying that Barbra was “like buttah.” Barbra poked her head out and said, “All this talk about food’s got me hungry, girls!” 

With all of the talk about butter, brings up how to store butter. I came to realize that while I use butter quite frequently with my cooking, having soft, spreadable butter was a missing component. I wanted my quality butter at room temperature from time to time, and I did not want the spreadable tubs found in the refrigerated section at the grocer which also (or only) contained margarine. My mind drifted back to my introduction to the butter pot from years past. The pottery container consists of two parts: a lid which resembles a bell, in which you pack the butter into; and the base, which the lid is placed into which contains water, about 1/4 inch to a 1/2 an inch depending on how big your butter keeper is. The lid combined with the water creates an airtight seal which keeps oxygen out, thus negating the need for refrigeration, and thereby allowing the butter to remain spreadable. The beauty of the butter keeper is that it serves as a presentation dish as well. Simply take the bell out of the base, flip over and place on the table. It looks as though it was intended to be a bowl holding butter. And when finished, no need to dirty another dish, just flip it back over into the base.

How to use a butter pot:  Make sure the butter is soft enough to work into the lid. If it is too hard, then air pockets will develop within the butter in the lid, which creates a suction affect when the lid is removed from the base of the crock. We recommend using the back of a spoon to push the butter into the lid. Make sure the butter is smoothed around and no air pockets are found. The butter must adhere to the inside of the lid, meaning there should be no space between the butter and the lid. By smoothing the butter internally within the lid, this should ensure that it properly adheres to the insides of the bell. Add the cold water to the base, and replace every 3 days with fresh water. If you carefully follow these directions, you should have no problems with the butter falling into the water.

Store the Butter pot away from heat.  Once your butter pot is packed with butter and ready to use, do not sit it next to the stove or store in direct sunlight. If the crock becomes heated, the butter can melt and fall out of the lid.

Change the water in the base of the crock. It is recommended to replace the water in the base of your crock every 3 days, with fresh, cold water. In warm summer months, we also recommend adding a few ice chips to the water to retain its coolness.

Wash in between uses. Your butter pot should be cleaned in between uses. It is very important to make sure that the lid of the crock is thoroughly dry before packing butter into it – otherwise the butter will not adhere properly to the inside of the lid.

At Compliments to the Chef, your Neighborhood Kitchen and Cutlery store, we carry marble and stoneware butter pots. We also carry butter dishes for those who like to refrigerate your butter. Storing butter is a preference. I know I like soft butter especially when making toast on Sunday mornings, having a cup of coffee, and maybe even watching or listening to Barbra Streisand. Her voice is like “buttah”. Remember my Foodie Friends; “Life Happens in the Kitchen.”

 Take Care,
John & PaulaREARDON ButterCake

Published in Food
Thursday, 04 March 2021 14:57

CSA’s Help Us Invest In Food and Farms

This time last year, we learned that a secure food supply could suddenly turn into shortages. Buying from local farms, which have a much shorter supply chain, is a great way to be assured of getting freshly harvested, quality food. Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) provides an even better guarantee.

By purchasing a CSA, customers make an early investment to help farmers get their season started, quite literally giving them seed money. Then, CSA members reap the harvest season’s benefits by receiving produce at a discounted price. Saratoga Farmers’ Market’s Wednesday and Saturday outdoor markets, which begin in May, will offer several CSA options.

Owl Wood Farm is one of the farms offering CSA subscriptions. They have traditional ‘Box Shares’ that run for 20 weeks, starting in June, for $450. Each share has a salad green, a cooking green, a root crop, an herb, a type of onion, and seasonal items, like strawberries, beans, or summer squash. The ‘box share’ is an excellent option for weekly shoppers who like variety and enjoy creative cooking. A second option is the ‘Market Share’: customers get “Owl Bills” to use at the farm’s stand whenever and for whatever they want. Any prepaid dollar amount over $200 receives a 10% credit added to it. Customers may purchase shares on Owl Wood’s website or learn more at the market when they return in late April.

Gomez Veggie Ville is also offering vegetable CSA shares to customers this season. Shares last for 24 weeks and consist of a variety of fruits and vegetables. Full shares include 8-10 items per week, depending on the season. Half shares have 4-5 items per week. Customers can opt for pre-packed boxes at $600 (full share) or $300 (half share) or choose the pick-your-own option for $650 or $325, respectively. Gomez Veggie Ville is already taking sign-ups at the Saturday farmers’ market. Contact them by phone for more information.

Other farms offer more specialized CSA options, like 518 Farms’ mushroom shares. Customers are sent a rotating list of available mushrooms two days before market day and can choose their mix to pick up on Saturdays. There is a small (½ lb per week for $140) or large (1 lb per week for $260) option; both run for 13 weeks. For more information, visit 518 Farms’ website or inquire at the winter market.

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is open Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Find us online at saratogafarmersmarket.org and follow us on Facebook and Instagram. For online pre-ordering and curbside pickup, visit localline.ca/saratoga-farmers-market.

FM SwissChardAndKaleGratin

Published in Food
Friday, 26 February 2021 15:00

Snow Fort Army Chow

Hello my Foodie Friends! 

This winter is certainly giving us plenty of snow. As I glance out into the white wonderland and watch the children in our neighborhood play, I reflect on some of my own fondest childhood memories playing in the snow. I enjoy sharing this story with you each winter. I grew up during a time when the average was at least four children per household and you were literally thrown outdoors to play and told not to come back home until the street lights came on. Playing in the snow included making homemade sleds to slide down the golf course hills, making snowmen, and of course, building the best snow fort in the neighborhood.  In our house we divided up the tasks to ensure that our “fort” could withstand repeated attacks of snowball wielding elementary school kids. In the creation of our snow fort, my brother Danny was the engineer and he mapped out how high and thick the walls should be. My youngest brother Billy was the builder and shaped the inside of the fort for the chairs, refrigerator and snow TV. The baby of our family Patty was support staff.  Since I was the oldest of the Reardon children clan, I was the recruiter and went door to door finding my soldiers and builders.  We were not allowed to use the phone back then (adults only), so when I came to the door and knocked you could hear a stampede of children in the house trying to get to the door. To get them to work on the fort I would tell them that my mother was making meatball sandwiches!  My mother’s meatballs were the envy of the neighborhood and far exceeded the bologna and spam the other kids were getting. My first stops were Dave and Karl’s houses and they lived next door to each other.  They were my age but already almost as tall as most of our fathers at the age of six. Dave turned out to be 6’8” and Karl is 6’6”. If you want your walls to be the highest, I thought, get the tallest kids.  My mother would grimace when she saw them coming as she knew she would need a lot more meatballs. Our first forts were wrecked at night by teenagers until my brother Dan came up with the idea to put water on the outside walls and it would turn them to ice.  You could hear the howls of the mean teenagers when they kicked the walls and they didn’t give so easily. 

To this day, when I talk with some of my childhood friends, they join me in reminiscing about the fun snow forts, and the reward of my mother’s meatball sandwiches. To this day, her meatballs remained unparalleled. However, Paula’s meatballs are on target with them especially since my mother did share her “secret” method with Paula. 

At Compliments to the Chef, your Neighborhood Kitchen and Cutlery store, we carry skillets to make your meatballs in, saucepans to make your sauce, baking sheets to pop your meatball hoagies into the oven with, and other really “Cool Tools for Cooks.” Meatball Hoagies are a great way to deal with these frosty winter days.  The neighborhood kids will love you!! Remember my Foodie Friends: “Life Happens in the Kitchen.”

 Take Care,
John & Paula

REARDON MeatballSub

Published in Food

Wintertime is a slower season at the farmers’ market. There are fewer vegetables and fruits in season, and there is a more intimate group of vendors. But innovation never stops for local businesses; customers can find new products almost every week. Here are some new arrivals and hidden gems to look out for the next time you shop in person or online at the Saratoga Farmers’ Market.

More digestible than cow milk yogurt and less processed than most plant-based options, R&G Cheesemakers’ goat milk Greek yogurts offer a solution for lactose intolerant yogurt fans. Choose from plain or strawberry. Their goat milk cheeses include more unusual finds like feta, which are also a great option.

Want an easy dinner solution that’s fresher than grocery store-bought? Try Argyle Cheese Farmer’s frozen pizzas, available in double cheese, garden veggie, and meat lovers-style (“Dave’s Fave”). They make the crusts with whey from their cheese which adds more protein, and they top the pies with their cheese curds.

Does your dog keep whining for a bite of your beef jerky? Next time you shop at Muddy Trail Jerky, add a chicken jerky pack to your bag. They make this jerky from dehydrated chicken breast, with dogs specifically in mind.

Do you hear more and more about the health benefits of some varieties of mushrooms? 518 Farms provides an even easier way to reap these benefits by offering pure lion’s mane and reishi mushroom powders. Add to loose leaf tea or coffee grounds, or make a mushroom tea or stock.

The cheesemakers at Nettle Meadow are always inventing. Their newest Schroon Moon, a line of spreadable cow milk cheeses, offers various flavors such as savory olive or chive or sweet lemon poppy seed.

Locally grown beans might not be what you would expect to find in Upstate New York in February. But now is prime time to pick up some legumes from Squash Villa Farm as the 2020 harvest is dried and ready for consumption. Choose between heirloom varieties of pinto or kidney or a variety pack of black, red, and white beans.

Something’s Brewing is known for its coffee beans and drinks, but don’t miss products like herbal tea (their hibiscus, vanilla, rose, and rooibos blend is refreshing) and coffee sugar (organic sugar blended with freshly ground spices).

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is open Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Find us online at saratogafarmersmarket.org and follow us on Facebook and Instagram. For online pre-ordering and curbside pickup, visit localline.ca/saratoga-farmers-market.

FM BeefShank

Published in Food

From Europe to the Middle East, the Saratoga Farmers’ Market has authentic foods from around the world available for take-out every Saturday. So even though we all had to cancel our travel plans this past year, you can still get a taste of your favorite international foods. What’s better is that you can take a break from cooking and enjoy delicious meals prepared by people who love sharing their native cuisine.

Euro Delicacies offers various flavorful Mediterranean dishes like stuffed grape leaves (dolma), baklava, and stuffed peppers. Try their moussaka; a casserole layered with potatoes, ground sirloin, and caramelized vegetables with bechamel sauce. Or spanakopita; a Greek pastry filled with chopped spinach, cheese, onion, olive oil, and seasonings. Euro Delicacies began in Sarajevo by the Hrelja family, now sharing their Eastern European heritage with the Upstate New York community. 

Giovanni Fresco has a selection of freshly made pasta, homemade sauces like alfredo and meat sauce, and entrees such as penne alla vodka and eggplant parmigiana. Some items can be purchased frozen as well so that you can stock up and enjoy fresh Italian food whenever you want. Giovanni Fresco was started in 2017 by Giovanni and Francesca, an Italian couple who moved to America with the hopes of bringing authentic and traditional Italian dishes to their new community. 

Petra’s Pocket Pies makes savory pita pies, a dough stuffed with combinations of vegetables, meats, and cheeses. Owner Sabreen Samman was inspired to share flavors from her home country of Jordan and began selling her savory pastries at the farmers’ market in 2018. Samman uses a blend of Mediterranean seasonings for her food and offers American style options, like buffalo chicken and Philly cheesesteak. 

My Dacha Slavonian Cafe makes various entrees like pierogies, lasagna, beef stroganoff, and cabbage stuffed with ground beef, tomato sauce, parsley, and rice. They offer a variety of homemade Slavic foods from Eastern Europe. Aladdin and Nataliya Kamel, from Egypt and Ukraine, blend their unique backgrounds to make classic dishes that reflect their home countries and their Italian cuisine knowledge. 

If you’re looking for fresh and tasty take-out food, try the melting pot of cuisines every Saturday. For complete menu options, online ordering, and delivery, check the businesses’ websites or retail locations.

EDITORS PICKS:
FAVORITE DISHES NOT TO MISS AT THE MARKET!

Euro Delicacies’ sweet potato salad is probably the best we’ve ever had. It’s made with steamed sweet potatoes and topped with walnuts, cranberries, and scallions, and tossed in an olive oil dressing. This dish is also vegan.

Giovanni Fresco has fried snacks that are a must-try. They make Italian-style arancini (fried rice balls) that are stuffed with cheese, meat, or vegetables. They also make American-inspired fried mac & cheese.

Petra’s Pocket Pies has a roasted chicken pita pocket with garlic aioli; a tasty comfort food that includes aioli sauce from Saratoga Garlic Company.

My Dacha’s lasagna is a Ukrainian take on traditional Italian comfort food. 

DONT FORGET THE DESSERT!

Euro Delicacies has baklava, a Turkish dessert made from a sweet pastry of layers of filo filled with chopped nuts and sweetened and held together with syrup or honey. Their famous apple strudel is a version of a Mediterranean apple pie made with filo dough.

Giovanni Fresco makes traditional and Nutella tiramisu; an Italian dessert made of ladyfingers dipped in coffee, layered with a whipped mixture of eggs, sugar, and mascarpone cheese, flavored with cocoa.

My Dacha Slavonian Cafe’s sweet crepes are filled with raisins and cheese, or poppy seeds. They are the perfect dessert to follow any of their savory dishes. They also offer Neapolitan cake, tiramisu, and baklava. 

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is open Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Find us online at saratogafarmersmarket.org and follow us on Facebook and Instagram. For online pre-ordering and curbside pickup, visit localline.ca/saratoga-farmers-market.

Published in Food
Thursday, 11 February 2021 15:15

Sowing Seeds for a New Season

Walking around a farmers’ market, you see tables neatly displayed with mountains of produce. There is a long journey before produce lands on market tables and then, eventually, your table. Farmers are on a tight schedule to do all they can to make sure their crops flourish. Now that we are deep into winter, we asked local farmers how they are preparing for this year’s growing season.

Laurie Kokinda, owner of Kokinda Farm, says, “It’s the hardest time of year, in terms of grunt work.” Farms are working tirelessly to sanitize their greenhouses and tunnels and repair and order new equipment. Farms are starting their first seedings like tomatoes, alliums, and head lettuce. This year, many farmers ordered their seed supply earlier than usual due to Coronavirus-related increases in demand as well as mail delays. Paul and Sandy Arnold, owners of Pleasant Valley Farm, note, “Normally, we can get seeds in the day after we order. This year, we’re waiting weeks!”

Local farms often choose to work together to share resources. Pleasant Valley Farm’s Sustainable Farmers’ Network Group is hard at work in the mid-winter, bulk-ordering supplies so that farms may share discounts. Gomez Veggie Ville works with Denison Farm to get this year’s supply of organic potato seeds. And, for the first time, they will work to grow ginger. “I am learning how to grow ginger well in our climate. Hopefully, if it works out, we’ll be able to bring some to the market in September,” says Efrain Gomez.

Owl Wood Farm is taking this year’s seed shortages as an opportunity to try a new practice: seed saving. “We’ve wanted to save seeds that aren’t offered commercially, like tomato heirloom varieties and Abenaki flint corn, for a while. It involves a lot of work and isn’t very economical; you have to dedicate a new plot of land and grasp a whole new knowledge base,” says Mark Bascom. “But we see that seed saving is important this year especially.”

Squash Villa Farm (formerly Squashville) is trying not just a new crop or practice but also a whole new land plot after moving farms in 2020. “There’s lots of anticipation! As soon as the snow melts, I’m eager to walk the new land and just get a feel for what it’s like to step into the soil,” says Gupta-Carlson.

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is open Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Find us online at saratogafarmersmarket.org and follow us on Facebook and Instagram. For online pre-ordering and curbside pickup, visit localline.ca/saratoga-farmers-market.

FM BeansGreens

Published in Food
Thursday, 04 February 2021 13:36

Game Day Super Snacking

With The Big Game quickly approaching, football fans might be thinking about the field, but we’re all looking forward to the snacks! 

The array of creamy dips, bite-sized snacks, and decadent desserts are certainly something to anticipate, even for those who aren’t big sports fans. Appetizers and finger food are the traditional spread for most, making for easy snacking between plays or the much-anticipated commercials. The Saratoga Farmers’ Market has options to meet all your snacking needs for next Sunday. Get your shopping done at the Saturday market to incorporate fresh, locally made ingredients into your Sunday spread. 

Whether you are cooking for a crowd or keeping it lowkey this year, we put together a few recipes that are sure to impress, using fresh ingredients from the market. And for the hardcore football fans looking forward to more traditional snacks, you can, of course, pick up plenty of wings or spinach and cheese for artichoke dip at the market too!

FM FriedPickles

FRIED PICKLES
Kick off the game with some savory and sweet fried pickles. Mix 1 cup flour with 1 tbsp garlic powder, 1 tbsp Cajun spice, and ½ tbsp cayenne pepper. Preheat an air fryer to 400. Grab 2 cups of your favorite flavor of pickles from Puckers Gourmet (we’re using the Dilly Sweet pickles, but you can substitute whatever you like) and coat with the flour mixture. Place in a single layer in the fryer and spray with olive oil. Cook for 10 minutes, then flip and cook for 5 more minutes. Serve warm with your favorite dipping sauce. 

FM BuffaloGoatCheeseBalls

BUFFALO GOAT CHEESE BALLS
If you’re craving something cheesy and a little unique, make some fried buffalo goat cheese balls. Add ⅓ cup of flour and a pinch of pepper to a medium bowl. Add one large beaten egg and 2 tablespoons of water to a separate shallow bowl. Add 1 ½ cups of panko breadcrumbs to another medium-sized bowl. Then your favorite flavor of goat cheese from Nettle Meadow or R&G Cheesemakers and roll it into 20-24 balls. Roll each ball in the flour, then dip in the egg mixture, and then cover in the panko mixture. Place the balls on a baking sheet and freeze for 20 minutes or until firm. Then heat 1-2 cups of oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat and fry the goat cheese balls in batches for 1-2 minutes until crispy brown. Remove and drain on a paper towel-lined surface. Serve hot with spicy buffalo dip from Argyle Cheese Farmer!

FM AppleNachos

APPLE NACHOS
For dessert, try making apple nachos, which are easy to customize to your taste and perfect if you’re looking for something a little lighter after all the afternoon snacking. Just cut Fuji apples (or apple of choice) from Saratoga Apple into thin slices and arrange on a plate. Then drizzle about ¼ cup of melted peanut butter (we’re using Plain Jane creamy from Saratoga Peanut Butter Company) and ¼ cup of melted semi-sweet chocolate over the apples. Top with a handful of chocolate chips or some granola to serve. 

The Saratoga Farmers’ Market is open Saturdays from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Find us online at saratogafarmersmarket.org and follow us on Facebook and Instagram. For online pre-ordering and curbside pickup, visit localline.ca/saratoga-farmers-market.

Published in Food
Page 5 of 18

Blotter

  • COURT Dylan K. Vella, 28, of Corinth, pleaded guilty to murder in the second-degree, in Saratoga County Court on Nov. 17. The charge – which also included three felony counts of assault – date to an April 7, 2020 incident in the town of Corinth during which Vella was accused of intentionally driving his vehicle into three motorcycles, causing physical injuries to one victim, serious physical injuries to two other victims and resulting in the death of a fourth victim – Paul Hollenbeck of Corinth. Vella additionally pleaded to one felony count sexual abuse in the first-degree regarding an incident…

Property Transactions

  • BALLSTON Eastline Holdings LLC sold property at 14 Timber Creek Dr to Bradley Gregg for $492,676. Manoj Irala sold property at 11 Timber Creek Dr.to Kumar Padala for $535,000. Charles Schewe sold property at 119 Ballston Ave to 838 Rentals LLC for $175,000. Volney Larowe sold property at 3 Lakehill Dr to Michael Cyrus for $195,000. CORINTH Sean Homes Excavating LLC sold property at 504 main St.to Anthony Villano for $190,000. GALWAY Thomas Shippey sold property at 5999 Greens Corner Rd to Laura Mancini for $405,000 GREENFIELD Valerie Bellon sold property at 70 Sand Hill Rd to Lauren Halligan for…
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