Displaying items by tag: saratoga

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Bolstered by now-classic performances of the songs “Maggie May,” “Mandolin Wind,” the album’s title track, and a moving rendition of Tim Hardin’s “Reason to Believe,” Rod Stewart’s 1971 solo album “Every Picture Tells a Story” will receive the Rochmon treatment at Caffe Lena on Tuesday, Nov. 21. 

Rochmon Record Club gathers once a month under the guidance of music savant Chuck Vosganian, who selects one ground-breaking rock or pop album to dig deep and wide in creating an entertaining, illuminating program of anecdotes, biographical, technical information and photos.

Stewart, accompanied by Ronnie Wood, was ascending to the height of his powers with “Every Picture Tells a Story”- an album cranky rock scribe Robert Christgau graded with an A-plus with extra credit for Rod the Mod’s ability of being “tawdry enough to revel in stellar pop-and-flash” while able to “refine the rock sensibility without processing the life out of it.”      

Doors at 6:30 p.m., presentation begins at 7, and a $5 donation is suggested.  Donations go to the restoration funds of Caffe’ Lena and Universal Preservation Hall.  

Published in Entertainment

ALBANY – Saratoga Springs native Ashley Bathgate – whose cello stylings have garnered acclaim by everyone from the New York Times (an “eloquent new music interpreter,”) to the Washington Post (“a glorious cellist’), returns to the region for a performance at The Egg, at the Empire State Plaza on Saturday, Nov. 18.

Last seen in these parts coaxing ethereal tones from the strings of her cello and slicing the air with resonating vibrations in a 2016 performance at the Tang Museum, Bathgate – a 2002 graduate of Saratoga Springs High School - will perform an entirely new series of reflections inspired by the Unaccompanied Cello Suites of J.S. Bach. The work incorporates extended performance techniques, live electronics, and external media resulting in a radical deconstruction and re-imagination of the original music.

Concert showtime is 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $28.  Students are $14 at the door – and special group rates are also available.  For more information on the concert, group sales and a special lecture/demonstration call:  THE EGG BOX OFFICE: 518-473-1845 www.theegg.org

In addition to the concert, Bathgate will be conducting a cello technique demonstration and master class at 5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18 at The Egg, where she will provide insight into her approach to playing the cello – both in the traditional manner as well as how she utilizes electronics that comprise “Bach Unwound.”  This event is free and open to the public.

Published in Entertainment
Tuesday, 21 November 2017 13:46

November 17th - November 21st

COURT

Nathan K. Stone, 27, of Middle Grove, pleaded Nov. 9 to felony burglary in Milton. Sentencing scheduled Jan. 18, 2018. 

Paula A. Watts, 35, of Saratoga Springs, was sentenced Nov. 8 to five years of probation, after pleading to aggravated DWI with a child, in Saratoga Springs. 

Juliana S. Dreweck, 41, of Schenectady pleaded Nov. 6 to felony DWI in Saratoga Springs. Sentencing scheduled for Nov. 25. 

Ezekiel J. West, 24, of Schenectady, was sentenced Nov. 6 to 1.5 years state prison, after pleading to attempted criminal possession of a weapon, a felony, in Saratoga Springs. 

Hartley E. Waller, 28, of Schuylerville, was sentenced Nov. 3 to 1.5 years state prison, after pleading to rape, in connection with an incident in Mechanicville. 

Alycia M. Andreadakis, 43, of Ballston Spa, pleaded Nov. 3 to felony attempted burglary, in Ballston. Sentencing scheduled Jan. 12, 2018. 

POLICE

Sarah E. Blackwell, 23, Cohoes, was charged Nov. 9 with false impersonation. 

Roy W Mort, 28, Cohoes, was charged Nov. 9 with criminal contempt first degree-felony. 

Clifford Williams, 54, Saratoga Springs, was charged Nov. 8 with offering a false instrumant for filing – felony, welfare fraud – a misdemeanor.

Daniel B. Bonesteel, 49, Saratoga Springs, was charged Nov. 8 with four misdemeanor counts criminal possession of a weapon, and one count assault.

Glen A. Perry, 33, Corinth, was charged Nov. 8 with aggravated unlicensed operation, unlawful use of mobile phones in motor vehicle, no/expired insurance, operating unregistered motor vehicle on highway.

Kevin D. Gailor, 30, Saratoga Springs, was charged Nov. 8 with assault.

Katelyn A. Spadafora, 28, Ballston Spa, was charged Nov. 8 with criminal mischief.

Randy L. Jones, 50, Schenectady, was charged Nov. 8 with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.

Fernando Loachamin, 30, Saratoga Springs, was charged Nov. 6 with aggravated unlicensed operation. 

Jonathan A. Shannon, 19, Greenfield Center, was charged Nov. 6 with two felony counts criminal sale of marijuana. 

Craig A. Plummer, 58, Greenfield, was charged Nov. 3 with unlicensed operation/refused chemical test. 

Kristin M. Anderson, 31, Saratoga Springs, was charged Nov. 3 with endangering the welfare of a child.

Jill A. Mason, 31, Saratoga Springs, was charged Nov. 3 with misdemeanor DWI, and criminal possession of a controlled substance. 

Justin E. Horsfield, 34, Argyle, was charged Nov. 3 with criminal possession of a controlled substance, failure to signal a turn. 

Anthony P. Delaurie, 40, Gansevoort, was charged Nov. 2 with misdemeanor assault.

Kortni I. Liedel, 21, Ballston Spa, was charged Nov. 2 with aggravated unlicensed operation, failure to display registration. 

Sean J. Cooney, 46, Central Square, was charged Nov. 2 with misdemeanor DWI, and aggravated DWI.

Kimberly C. McFerran, 40, Mariah Center, was charged Nov. 2 with aggravated unlicensed operation. 

Erin L. Canning, 39, Saratoga Springs, was charged Nov. 2 with aggravated harassment.

John M. Ruggiero, 32, Rexford, was charged Nov. 2 with misdemeanor DWI, and failure to obey traffic control device. 

Samantha L. Jacobson, 30, Albany, was charged Nov. 2 with misdemeanor DWI, unsafe lane change, failure to keep right.

Jerald V. Stephen, 40, Saratoga Springs, was charged Nov. 1 with obstruction of breathing or blood circulation.

Alberto Lijo, 23, Parsippany, was charged Nov. 1 with criminal possession of marijuana, criminal possession of a controlled substance. 

Patrick F. Mcloughlin, 26, Niskayuna, was charged Nov. 1 with misdemeanor DWI, speeding, aggravated DWI, and aggravated unlicensed operation.

Randy L. Jones, 50, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 31 with misdemeanor petit larceny. 

John P. Valentin, 22, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 31 with obstruction of breathing or blood circulation.

Nicholas M. Pucci, 27, Cohoes, was charged Oct. 31
with criminal mischief.

David D. Farr, 36, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 31 with attempt petit larceny, criminal possession stolen property, and two counts criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Anna J. Jastrzab, 31, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 31 with misdemeanor DWI, refuse pre-screen test, leaving the scene of an auto accident, and criminal mischief. 

Mickey C. Knorr, 32, Queensbury, was charged Oct. 29 with misdemeanor DWI, aggravated unlicensed operation, failure to notify DMV change of address, following motor vehicle
too closely. 

Danielle D. Montville, 24, Saratoga Springs, and Kysha T. Truong, age 25, Ballston Spa, were each charged Oct. 29 with assault.

Galen J. Seerup, 30, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 28 with felony DWI, and operating motor vehicle suspended registration

Published in Police Blotter

SARATOGA SPRINGS - As part of Saratoga Performing Arts Center’s continued commitment to presenting programming that extends beyond the traditional summer months, SPAC announced that the Orchestra of St. Luke’s will perform Bach’s beloved Brandenburg Concertos at Bethesda Episcopal Church on Friday, Dec. 8. Show time is 7 p.m. Tickets are $20 General Admission seats and can be purchased online at spac.org.

“To be able to present some of Bach’s most beloved repertoire performed by one of the world’s great chamber orchestras in an acoustically and architecturally exquisite space during the festive holiday season is a great privilege,” said Elizabeth Sobol, SPAC president and CEO, in a statement.

David Hyde Pierce, Saratoga Springs native and Board Member of Orchestra of St. Luke’s praised the return of Orchestra of St. Luke’s to Saratoga and the new initiative:

“This concert means so much to me. SPAC was where as a young boy I first encountered the great artistry of the orchestra and the ballet; Bethesda, a place of comfort and worship for my family, was where I sang in the choir and learned to play the organ; the Orchestra of St Luke’s is the finest musical ensemble I’ve ever known, and they’re like family to me. It is a rare opportunity to hear music this great played this beautifully in such an exquisite setting— but that’s Saratoga. “

The Orchestra of St. Luke’s performs approximately 80 concerts each year at venues such as Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center.

The December 8 “SPAC @ Bethesda Church” program will feature Bach’s six Brandenburg Concertos, which were composed as a gift to the Margrave of Brandenburg in 1721, and are still considered pinnacles of the Baroque repertoire. 

Published in Entertainment

SARATOGA SPRINGS - At precisely seven minutes after 11 on the night of Nov. 7, Meg Kelly was declared winner as the 21st mayor of the city of Saratoga Springs.

“I have so much to be grateful for,” Kelly told an exuberant crowd at the Inn at Saratoga where her fellow Democrats congregated election night. “I have a crew that has worked endless hours, with a limited budget, and we killed it.”

Members of the Republican Party were stationed directly across the street at the Holiday Inn, where a near-life size cardboard figure of President Donald Trump greeted all who entered. 

Kelly, currently the city’s deputy mayor, will begin her two-year-term Jan. 1, 2018. She defeated Republican candidate Mark Baker 4,630 - 3,911, or by a 54.13 percent to 45.73 percent margin. There were 8,742 ballots cast in the mayoral race. 

Voters also elected Democrat Peter Martin as commissioner of public safety. Martin - currently one of two supervisors representing the city at the county level – defeated Republican Donald Braim by a narrow 4,217 to 4,021 margin, and Democrat Francine Vero bested Republican challenger Andrew Blumenberg by a wide margin for the city judgeship.

In the vote to elect two city supervisors, 8,724 ballots were cast. Republican incumbent Matt Veitch - with 28.76 percent of the vote, and Democrat Tara Gaston – with 24.3 percent of the vote, were chosen to serve the city. Democrat Pat Friesen (22.94 percent), Republican John Safford (22.39 percent), and Green Party candidate Joseph Levy (1.56 percent) finished out of the running.   

Republican DPW Commissioner Anthony “Skip” Scirocco, and Democrats John Franck, accounts commissioner, and Michele Madigan, finance commissioner, were each re-elected in uncontested races for City Council seats. Between 243 and 295 votes were cast in the three uncontested races for write-in candidates, garnering approximately four to five percent of the overall tally in each race. The names of those write-in candidates will be documented and made public later this month, according to the Saratoga County Board of Elections.       

Kelly vowed to preserve the greenbelt, fix the city’s parking issues, and work collaboratively with the council’s four other members.

Current city Mayor Joanne Yepsen, who chose not to run for re-election, reminisced Tuesday about the night she first secured elected office by becoming the city supervisor in the 2005 election.   

"Twelve years ago, I stood in this room and accepted my first job in public service," Yepsen recalled. Since announcing her decision to not seek re-election as mayor, there has been much public speculation about her future political plans.    

"There will be no formal announcement this evening," Yepsen said. Asked whether she is keeping the proverbial door open to a political run in the future, Yepsen replied, "I'll always have an eye on how to help people more, always an eye on the political landscape."

Residents also voted in favor of changing the city’s Commission form of governing 4,202 to 4,154, but the miniscule margin of victory requires absentee ballots be counted. The county Board of Elections mailed 711 such absentee ballots and those returned by Nov. 14 will be counted on Tuesday, when a clear winner may be determined. 

Published in News
Thursday, 16 November 2017 15:05

November 10th - November 16th

COURT

Noah Graj, 38, of Pleasantville, was sentenced Oct. 30 to five years of probation, after pleading to attempted criminal possession of a controlled substance, in Saratoga Springs. 

Aleah A. Carero, 20, of Greenfield, pleaded Oct. 31 to felony burglary. Sentencing scheduled Jan. 9, 2018. 

Kile W. West, 22, of Milton, pleaded Oct. 27 to felony burglary, in Greenfield. Sentencing scheduled for Jan. 15. 

Morgan C. McKinnon-Burgess, 20, of Saratoga, was sentenced Nov. 2 to three years of probation, after pleading to felony forgery. 

Lance E. Abare, 26, of Corinth, was sentenced Nov. 2 to 1.5 to 3 years in state prison, after pleading to felony burglary, in Moreau.

Devon J. Krisanda, 22, of Ballston Lake, pleaded Oct. 27 to attempted criminal possession of a controlled substance, a felony. Sentencing scheduled Jan. 5. 

POLICE

Amy E. Torres, age 26, Durham, North Carolina, was charged Oct. 26 with criminal possession of a controlled substance. 

Lamont C. Washington, age 27, Ballston Spa, was charged Oct. 26 with no/expired inspection certificate, aggravated unlicensed operation.

Brandyn M. French, age 27, Ballston Lake, was charged Oct. 25 with two felony counts criminal possession of stolen property and two misdemeanor counts theft of services/stolen credit card. 

Gregory M. Hogan, age 55, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 25 with assault.

Michael J. Vittengl, age 60, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 25 with petit larceny.

Stephen T. Ouimet, age 42, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 25 with endangering the welfare of a child 

Kenyn T. Shattuck, age 25, Middle Grove, was charged Oct. 25 with aggravated unlicensed operation, failed to stop at stop sign.   

Carolyn M. Kroll, age 50, Schenectady, was charged Oct. 24 with criminal possession of a forged instrument – felony.   

Kimberly J. Daignault, age 48, Gansevoort, was charged Oct. 24 with aggravated unlicensed operation, fail to obey traffic control device. 

Ashley A. Tappan, age 31, Ballston Spa, was charged Oct. 24 with felony DWI. two misdemeanor counts criminal possession of a controlled substance.

Elizabeth A. Lloyd, age 28, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 23 with aggravated unlicensed operation, operating unregistered motor vehicle on highway.   

Riley J. Cage, age 16, Wilton, was charged Oct. 23 with unlawful possession of weapon upon school grounds. 

Ashley M. Abbott, 25, of Ballston Spa, was charged Oct. 31 with two counts assault and two counts endangering the welfare of a child. She is accused of physically disciplining two children – 9 and 4 years of age, respectively – with a belt which resulted in physical injury, in the town of Milton. 

Reece N. Freeman, 20, of Ballston Spa, was charged Oct. 28 with DWI, reckless endangerment and falsely reporting an incident. According to the Saratoga County Sheriff’s Department, it is alleged Freeman informed police on scene that he was a passenger in a vehicle that was submerged in water, prompting deputies to enter the water in an effort to offer assistance. Freeman subsequently admitted he was the operator of the vehicle and no one else was inside the car, according to police. 

Jeremiah R. Bennett, 18, of Schenectady, was charged Nov. 1 with felony burglary and grand larceny. It is alleged he entered the attached garage of a dwelling in the town of Ballston and stole an item valued at over $1,000.  Bennett was sent to Saratoga County Jail in lieu of $5,000 cash, or $10,000 bond. 

Lee W. Steele, 62, of Milton, was charged Nov. 1 with misdemeanor sexual abuse, on the suspicion that he had sexual contact with a 17-year-old female victim who is deemed intellectually disabled, according to the Saratoga County Sheriff’s Department.

Ricardo Bastidas, age 37, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 17 with aggravated unlicensed operation, speeding. 

Jessica L. Colton, age 33, Greenfield Center, was charged Oct. 17 with aggravated unlicensed operation, fail to obey traffic control device. 

Joshua C. Busold, age 19, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 16 with criminal possession of a controlled substance, unlawful possession of marijuana, equipment (tinted rear window), failed to signal a turn.

James S. Sluti, age 33, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 16 with criminal contempt, assault, criminal mischief. 

Published in Police Blotter

SARATOGA SPRINGS – After 16 months of study, dozens of public meetings, threats of litigation, and a volley of contentious words, 8,356 city residents headed to the polls on Tuesday to decide whether to change, or maintain the Commission form of governing that has ruled the city for the past 102 years. The Election Day verdict: Too Close To Call. 

At the end of the day, residents in favor of adopting a new Charter held a 4,202 to 4,154 advantage, but the narrow margin of victory requires that absentee ballots be counted. The county Board of Elections mailed 711 such absentee ballots and more than 500 were received back, by Election Day. Those ballots have yet to be counted.

Ballots returned by Nov. 14 - the last day absentee ballots may be received at the county Board of Elections - will be counted on Tuesday, Nov. 14, after which a clear winner may be determined. Military ballots have until Nov. 20 to be received at the county board. Military ballots are anticipated to number less than 20 in total, although that count could not be officially verified by Thursday.  

Less than half of the approximately 18,000 registered city voters took part in Tuesday’s election; More than 95 percent of city residents who did cast ballots voted one way or another on The Saratoga Springs Charter Proposition. 

The study of ramifications in changing from a Commission form of government to a Council-Manager form has been lengthy, and the dialogue among some, contentious.

After a proposal was put forth to stage the referendum last May rather than in November, there was significant push-back from City Council members John Franck, Michele Madigan, and DPW Commissioner Anthony “Skip” Scirocco - three commissioners who coincidentally ran unopposed in their respective re-election campaigns.  “This will come down to a lawsuit, I suspect, and the courts will decide what they’re going to do with this,” Franck said in February. “There may even be a lawsuit at the City Council level.”

Election Day was anticipated as the date to finally settle the matter. But given the slim 48-vote difference - with those in favor of change leading the count - it has not turned out that way. 

“I woke up this morning and thought: win or lose the charter debate was going to end today,” Saratoga Springs City Charter Review Commission Chairman Bob Turner said in the early morning hours following the election tally. “I realize now, we’re just beginning. It’s like Florida 2000 all over again and I have a feeling it’s going to be drawn out to a re-count, and a hand-count of ballots.” Turner is in favor of Charter change.  

“I have a feeling we are heading toward very brand-new legal territory in the next week,” Turner said.  “New York Municipal Home Rule Law 36, which governs the charter review process, (says) the charter review commission ends on the day of election, so it’s not even clear whether we are going to have legal standing after today. Who is turn is representing the voters who at present are up 48 votes?”

Accounts Commissioner John Franck on Thursday called for a Special City Council meeting to take place at noon on Monday to hire an election law attorney "to defend the city’s right to have all proper absentee ballots counted and defending the city’s voters in any potential court proceedings."  

“It is new territory,” said Richard Sellers, a spokesman for SUCCESS, a citizen organization that supports maintaining the current form of governing. “We’re reminded of the cliché that every vote counts, and we are waiting for all the votes to be counted. We’re confident in the Saratoga County Board of Elections and we look forward to a clear outcome.”

The county Board of Elections is anticipated to begin counting absentee ballots on Tuesday, Nov. 14.  

Published in News
Thursday, 09 November 2017 12:51

November 3rd - November 9th

COURT

Garrett M. Weatherwax, 23, of Ballston Spa, pleaded Oct. 25 to promoting a sexual performance by a child, a felony. Sentencing scheduled for Dec. 20. 

Frank J. Rossi, 26, of Mechanicville, was sentenced Oct. 24 to five years of probation, after pleading to criminal contempt, in connection with an incident in Malta. 

Victor C. Mattson, 39, of Rotterdam Junction, pleaded on Oct. 23 to robbery, in connection with an incident in Ballston. Sentencing scheduled for Dec. 18. 

Lisa M. Lyng, 37, of Saratoga Springs, was sentenced Oct. 23 to five years of probation, after pleading to felony DWI in Wilton.   

Michael J. Davis, of Clifton Park, was sentenced Oct. 23 to 15 years in state prison and 1-1/2 to 3 years post-release supervision, for menacing a police officer, criminal contempt, and assault.  On April 16, Davis, with a shotgun, entered the home of his wife and children in the town of Halfmoon in violation of a stay-away order of protection. His wife and children, in addition to other children in the home at the time, were able to flee unharmed. Davis fired several shots out the window of the residence at officers, according to the county district attorney’s office, before eventually surrendering to authorities more than 20 hours after the start of negotiations with state police. 

Jeanne E. Gorcesky, 50, of Saratoga Springs, pleaded Oct. 19 to felony DWI in connection with an incident in Wilton. Sentencing scheduled for Dec. 17. 

Angela M. Burnside, 36, of Ballston Lake, was sentenced Oct. 19 to three years of probation, after pleading to aggravated DWI, a felony, in Ballston Spa. 

POLICE

Lance M. Smith, age 23, of Mayfield, was charged Oct. 25 with tampering with physical evidence – a felony, DWI while operating a commercial vehicle, aggravated DWI felony, unreasonable speed, operating out of class, and fail to keep right. At 11:30 a.m. on Oct. 25, the Saratoga Springs Police responded to Geyser Road at the railroad overpass for an overturned box truck blocking the roadway, located about 1/2 mile west of Route 50.  According to police, the truck went off the right side of the roadway colliding with the guiderail, and subsequently overturned on its side. The driver and sole occupant of the truck was not injured, but was allegedly found to be intoxicated. 

Christopher R. Bergeron, 38, currently at Greene Correctional Facility, was charged Oct. 24 with five counts burglary, in connection with five separate incidents reported in July and August of 2016, in which Bergeron is accused of burglarizing two homes in Corinth, and one each in the towns of Ballston, Providence and Greenfield.

Kristopher F. Docherty, 29, of Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 27 with felony assault. he is accused of causing physical injury by throwing a bottle of wine at a woman following an alleged domestic incident in Wilton. 

Richard A. Faria III, 39, of Mechanicville, was charged Oct. 20 with Criminal Possession of a Weapon, and Grand Larceny, after allegedly stealing a handgun from a residence he was conducting work in, in the town of Ballston. 

Brian A. Mollnow, age 21, Clifton Park, was charged Oct. 22 with misdemeanor DWI. 

Attilia M. Lee, age 20, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 22 with criminal possession of a forged instrument – felony. 

Monique N. Williams, age 26, Schenectady, was charged Oct. 22 with seven counts of criminal possession of a controlled substance, and one count false impersonation. 

Robert Ruiz, age 38, Schenectady, was charged Oct. 22 with criminal possession of a controlled substance, and criminally using drug paraphernalia second degree.

Aniece M. Armstrong, age 29, Schenectady, was charged Oct. 20 with Offenses: aggravated unlicensed operation, failed to signal a turn, no/expired insurance. 

James A. Lorman, age 30, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 20 with public lewdness. 

Louis W. Rondinello, age 52, Hampton Bays, was charged Oct. 20 with reckless endangerment of property.

Anthony R. Fiorey, age 53, Ballston Spa, was charged Oct. 20 with speeding, and aggravated unlicensed operation. 

Chad F. Harrison, age 30, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 17 with misdemeanor DWI and aggravated DWI, failure to signal a turn, failure to keep right. 

Brittany N. Sims, age 28, Schenectady, was charged Oct. 17 with unlawful possession of marijuana, operating mv impaired by drugs, speeding, criminal possession of a controlled substance. 

Ricardo Bastidas, age 37, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 17 with aggravated unlicensed operation, speeding. 

Taylor L. Hudson, age 16, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 17 with assault, endangering the welfare of a child. 

Jessica L. Colton, age 33, Greenfield Center, was charged Oct. 17 with aggravated unlicensed operation, fail to obey traffic control device. 

Joshua C. Busold, age 19, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 16 with criminal possession of a controlled substance, unlawful possession of marijuana, equipment (tinted rear window), failed to signal a turn.

James S. Sluti, age 33, Saratoga Springs, was charged Oct. 16 with criminal contempt, assault, criminal mischief. 

Published in Police Blotter
Thursday, 02 November 2017 13:09

Ice Cream Dreams

Paul Nasrani walked through Grand Central Terminal on a cold wintry day when a moment of opportunity suddenly intervened, offering him the possibility to fulfill a childhood dream.

“Every summer, I’d spend a couple of weeks in August up in Lake George, in Silver Bay,” Nasrani recalled.  “There was this well-over 100-year-old ice cream store that was everybody’s gathering place and I was allowed to have a hot fudge sundae, five nights a week, which was pretty awesome. That was etched in my mind as a child.” 

Nasrani worked in Manhattan and became the CFO of a mid-size corporation, his days occupied with his professional work in finance and accounting, his nights at play feeding a love of creating ice cream.  

“I started experimenting in a small studio apartment in Manhattan. Imagine this tiny place with one room and a kitchen you stand in, making ice cream at night and bringing it in to work for my co-workers every day,” he says.  “They loved it. They even got me a bigger maker, which I had to put in the tub because I couldn’t fit it in the kitchen,” he laughs. “It was insanity, but it was fun. Any time I had a free moment I’d visit dairies and ice cream plants. I’d knock on doors and hope somebody would let me in.  I learned a lot from people.”

It was this yearning he carried with him inside the cathedral-like building of the Grand Central Terminal, where among the bustling crowds on a landscape of marble he noticed some equipment from a former ice cream store up for auction.   

“I ended up buying a machine. I quit my job. I put the machine on a trailer and moved up to Silver Bay,” he says. Nasrani set up shop in the hamlet of Silver Bay, which sits alongside Lake George, an hour’s drive north of downtown Saratoga Springs. 

“I can remember being about 12 years old and sitting there thinking: someday I’m going to have an ice cream company and we’re going to sell the ice cream in the Silver Bay store. And I did do that. We did make ice cream there and we did sell it at the store.”

Nasrani founded Adirondack Creamery at Silver Bay and with a yearning for growth found a dairy in Kingston where he was able to design his own ice cream based on an old-fashioned recipe of cream, milk, sugar and egg yolks. More expansion followed. One of the company’s primary distributors is located in Saratoga on Edie Road, and a dairy production facility in Queens enabled Adirondack Creamery to release all-natural flavors in pint packaging that could be sold at retail stores.

Today, the company boasts more than a dozen different flavors and includes seasonal favorites like Pumpkin Pie, Peppermint Stick and Egg Nog, and limited-edition offerings such as Caramel Apple, made only with ingredients from upstate New York.

The latest flavor is a Syrian date and walnut creation inspired by the middle-eastern treat, ma’amoul.

“I’m not Syrian, but immigration really reflects on my own personal life, my own family history. I grew up in a part in northeastern Pennsylvania where most of the people were ancestors of coal miners who came in the late 1800s and the 1900s for the same thing. They were suffering and there was famine.  They were persecuted and came here to live a different life and to have a future,” Nasrani says.  

“My father was emigrated from post-partition India in the ‘60s in Pakistan, trying to get away from discrimination and find opportunity and growth, to have a family and be able to be who he wanted to be. My mother’s family dates back to the Mayflower and the pilgrims – and those people also came here looking for a better future - and so all of that has had an impact on me personally.”

Nasrani found out about a Syrian refugee family who started making ma’amoul treats and selling them online.

“I ordered a whole bunch of them and I loved it. That’s when it all clicked,” Nasrani says. “I thought: you know let me make an ice cream flavor and see if I can put this together. The idea is that what’s unique about this is that in America we adopt flavors from other countries, put them in our kitchen and make them our own. The ma’amoul ice cream follows that same line. You know when people share food it breaks down a lot of cultural barriers. It reminds us that we’re more similar than we are different.”

The label’s packaging proclaims “Peace” in Arabic, English and Hebrew and is designed to bring focus to the plight of Syrian families seeking refuge who do not have a voice. Nasrani is donating half the profits of the ma’amoul ice cream to the International Rescue Committee. The organization responds to the world’s worst humanitarian crises and helps people whose lives and livelihoods are shattered by conflict and disaster to survive, recover, and gain control of their future.

You might wonder what a love of ice cream does to a person’s personal life.

“When I met (the woman who would be) my wife, she assumed I was some boring finance guy. On our third date I told her, ‘You’re not going to want to date me anymore. I’m quitting my job and moving up to Lake George.’ I thought she was going to be like, ‘Goodbye. You’re not going to make any money and you’re moving.’ Well now we’ve been married for 12 years and have two kids,” Nasrani says. “I won her over. It’s been an exciting journey.”

Adirondack Creamery’s Syrian Date and Walnut flavor ice cream is currently available at the following regional stores, with more stores to be added in the coming weeks: Four Seasons Natural Foods, 120 Henry St., Saratoga Springs; Just Meats, 1023 Route 29, Schuylerville; select ShopRite supermarkets in Albany, Colonie, Niskayuna and Slingerlands; the Honest Weight Co-Op in Albany, and Niskayuna Co-Op in Schenectady.  

 

 

Published in News
Thursday, 02 November 2017 12:59

Following the Money in City Elections

SARATOGA SPRINGS - Republican city mayoral candidate Mark Baker entered the final 11 days of his campaign with about $23,380 on hand, while Democrat city mayoral candidate Meg Kelly reported a balance of approximately $14,600 during the same period, according to campaign financial disclosure reports, provided by the New York State Board of Elections.

Citizens for Yepsen, who also filed a report 11 days prior to the Nov. 7 election, has about $3,850 in the bank. Current city Mayor Joanne Yepsen has elected to not seek re-nomination to the two-year post.

Baker’s campaign began with about $21,500 on hand in July. Financial contributors to Baker’s campaign include a handful of local builders, construction companies and developers, John Hendrickson and Marylou Whitney, and local GOP political figures Shauna Sutton and Michael Lenz. Baker was previously the long-time president of the City Center Authority.  

Kelly, currently the city’s Deputy Mayor, entered the race with $6,000 on hand in July. Kelly’s financial supporters include prominent City Democrats Raymond Watkins, Bill McTygue and Bahram Kermmati, as well as current city Supervisor Peter Martin. Political committees supporting current officeholders Mayor Joanne Yepsen, Judge Francine Vero and Accounts Commissioner John Franck have also contributed to Kelly’s campaign.

In the other contested race for a seat on the five-person City Council – Commissioners Franck, Madigan, and Scirocco are unopposed - Public Safety Commissioner hopefuls Don Braim (R, C, I, RFM), and Peter Martin (D, WF, WEP), reported balances of approximately $9,350, and $3,500, respectively, as of their filings of Oct. 27.

A local vote will also be held Nov. 7 regarding the city’s form of governing to decide whether to switch from a commission form of government to one run by a city manager.

The group Saratogians United to Continue the Charter Essential to Sustain our Success, or SUCCESS, is in favor of maintaining the current form of governing, and reported about $25,000 on hand in its 11 Day Pre-General Report filing. Notable contributors to the group include Charles V. Wait and W.P. Dake - each contributing $3,000; J.T. Roohan and John Hendrickson - each contributing $2,000; and Joseph W. Dalton, James Lavigne, Michael Hoffman, Frank Parillo, Thomas J. Newkirk, the Allerdice Building Supply Company and Mazzone Administrative Group each contributed $1,000 or more.

It’s Time Saratoga! – the group in favor of changing the current form of governing in the city to one run by a city manager reported just under $19,500 on hand in its 11 Day Pre-General Report filing. Among the group’s largest financial contributors are the nonprofit International City/County Management Association – who contributed $15,000, and the New York State City/County Management Association, who donated $2,500. Gary Dake ($500), and Gordon Boyd ($750), are among notable individual donors to It’s Time Saratoga! Boyd, who has acknowledged a change of mind regarding charter change in Saratoga Springs, initially donated $300 to the SUCCESS organization when it first started in 2006.

Published in News
Page 48 of 66

Blotter

  • Saratoga County Court Matthew J. Gifford, 31, of Saratoga Springs, was sentenced to 5 days incarceration and 5 years probation, after pleading to felony DWI, charged February 2024 in Saratoga Springs.  Kevin P. Masterson, 52, of Mechanicville, was sentenced to 6-1/2 years incarceration / 5 years post-release supervision, after pleading to criminal possession of a weapon in the second-degree, charged May 2023.  Shawn Flores, 45, of Milton, pleaded to criminal contempt in the first-degree, charged February 2024. Sentencing July 30.  Nicholas F. Bonfante, 44, of Halfmoon, pleaded to criminal sale of a controlled substance in the second-degree, a felony, charged…

Property Transactions

  • BALLSTON  Eastline Holdings LLC sold property at 1 Aspen Drive to Sateeshnvss and Srividya Gudipaty for $549,980 Adesh Budhraj sold property at 1 Larkin Road to Katz Excavating and Construction LLC for $65,000 CORINTH William and Robert Morgan sold property at 677 County Route 25 to Christin Guilder for $285,000 GALWAY Rita Werner and Erin Forlenza sold property at 1064 West Galway Road to Karen Crandall for $145,000 GREENFIELD Desolation Ventures Inc. sold property at 498 Lake Desolation Road to MW Real Estate Enterprises, LLC for $680,000 Justin Kelsey sold property at 519 North Creek Road to Scott and David…
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